M58 Motoway junction at Ashworth/Melling

I went to have a look at how the junction works were coming along and clearly things are starting to take shape where the new slip road will be going in for traffic to access the M58 west to Switch Island:-

This shot is taken from where Giddygate Lane presently joins the junction but that lane is being diverted as part of the works. The new pedestrian steps and cycle path can clearly be seen.

And whilst I’m on about that junction, regular readers may recall me saying how unsafe I thought the end of the cycle path around this very same motorway junction is. Here’s my original post about it from April 2018:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2018/04/28/melling-when-a-cycle-path-ends/

Well this is how things look now!:-

I feel like saying to Sefton Council and Highways England ‘I told you so’ – the cycle path ends too near to the junction and in my opinion it’s still dangerous.

Click on the photos to enlarge them

Formby – What is a Yort?

I’ve cycled past this street nameplate many times and like others in our cycling group I have scratched my head wondering what a Yort is?

Googling ‘Yort’ did not throw up any answers so my fellow cycler Roy Connell emailed the Clerk of Formby Parish Council who told him the term may mean ‘Yard’ but also suggested that we ask the views of Formby Civic Society. An e-mail to the Civic Society brought back this:-

‘I have been doing some digging in our archive and attach a newspaper cutting from about 1957 which gives some interesting background information. We hold a copy of all 10 sheets of the 1845 Tithe map and the Schedule shows Formby had 83 plots incorporating the name “Yort”.

Today I know of a house at 94 Gores Lane called Long Yort www.flickr.com/photos/formbycivicsociety/5885064473/in/album-72157625287478503/

Below is an article from “An Agricultural Study of Formby with Ainsdale” By Kim Morton (1981) Edited by J. Lewis, M. Adams & C. Ahmad which actually is related to Andrews Yort.’

Orchards

Hume (1866, 77) claimed that the first orchard in all of Lancashire was in Ravenmeols; the site was shown to him by the inhabitants of Park House in Ravenmeols, located to the south of Kirklake, in the same neighbourhood[1]. The piece of ground was called Andrew’s Gardens, or Bowers Gardens so named because two hundred years previously (about 1665) it had been occupied by Andrew Brown. His orchard had been famous for its apples (Kelly, 1973, 22). However, the orchards were destroyed by the sand moving inland and now nothing remains but the ‘mounds of sand and tufts of starrgrass’ (Hume 1866, 77). Local folklore states that Andrews Lane and Andrews Yort of the present day represent Andrew Brown’s holdings in Ravenmeols. Holt (1795, 83) comments that ‘…there are no orchards worthy of notice in this part of the country’ at the end of the 18th century (1795, 83).

So now you know what a ‘Yort’ is assuming if, like me, you were in the dark about it before.

My thanks to Formby Civic Society for their invaluable help with this posting

Click on the photos to enlarge them

Maghull – Plans out for consultation to build its vast urban extension – 1685 houses

After all the political fallout of recent years regarding Sefton Council’s Local Plan the biggest controversy within that plan is coming to its detailed conclusion.

Two separate planning applications for 1685 houses to be constructed on Land East of Maghull have now been put out to public consultation by Sefton Council.

The planning application numbers are DC/2017/01532 and DC/2017/01528. and the closing date for objections is 17th August 2019.

I understand that around 1100 letters have been posted out by Sefton Planning Services to those near the site and anyone who has submitted an objection previously.

The vast Maghull East urban extension (presently high grade agricultural land) site as seen from Poverty Lane, Maghull

I could rehearse all my many postings written for this blog site from the recent past but I’ve had my say and sadly I lost the battle so I’ll just put the relevant information out there with one thought – Why put the high grade agricultural land which grows our food under bricks, tarmac and concrete? What sense does that make?

Fracking in Great Altcar

Sadly it seems that things are moving forward to frack on land in Great Altcar to the east of Formby and north west of Lydiate.

The link below gives some detail on what is proposed:-

drillordrop.com/2019/07/17/plans-published-for-new-lancashire-fracking-site/

And here’s a link to a previous posting of mine on this matter associated with The Moss Alliance campaign group when they addressed Lydiate Parish Council last September:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2018/09/27/lydiate-parish-council-gets-insight-into-fracking/

I remain opposed to fracking.

Here’s a petition to sign if you share my concerns:-

you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/against-fracking-at-great-altcar

Kirkby – Maghull – Town centers both looking for a better look

When I first saw the headline (see link below) I wondered how a council could ‘buy’ a town but then realised the headline had ‘center’ missing from it.

www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/merseyside-town-bought-council-radical-16616754

I then wondered if it was Sefton Council buying Maghull Square but the photo did not look right.

Of course it’s Kirkby town center that the Echo article is all about, a saga that goes back many, many years indeed.

And then I thought back about Maghull Square and the long promised refurb’s that go back many, many years via different owners and wondered what it will take…………..

This is Maghull Square in the 1970’s but the buildings are still pretty much as was. It was built in the 1960’s. Photographer unknown.

Rimrose Valley Country Park – Latest news about HE’s new road

I was sent this yesterday from Highways England as a Lydiate Parish Councillor:-

‘As you will be aware, we faced a legal challenge regarding our preferred route choice for the A5036 Port of Liverpool access scheme. This was lodged in November 2017 and heard by the court in October 2018. The court ruled in favour of the preferred route option but naturally the challenge has impacted on the 2019 construction date. We now expect to start work in late 2022 or early 2023.

We are fully committed to working alongside our partners and local community to ensure we have a solution which benefits everyone.

Traffic will only increase on the existing road and wider network beyond the Port of Liverpool. The bypass proposal we are looking to take forward will not only address congestion in these areas but improve the quality of life for those living along the existing road. It will also provide more reliable journeys and improved links to the region whilst future proofing the network.

The bypass will also enable the regions aspirations for economic growth. The improved road network will benefit proposals for new housing and commercial developments as well as servicing Liverpool2.’

I have not copied the whole of the text just the relevant part of it, I would add.

Clearly the determination of Highways England to move forward with this new road despite very significant opposition is a huge disappointment to those of us who oppose a new road being driven through this country park.

An idyllic view of Rimrose Valley Country Park

But knowing how equally determined Rimrose Valley Friends are to try to stop the new road being built there are bound to be more twists and turns in this ongoing battle of wills.

Rimrose Valley Country Park map.