Sefton Council provides FUN?

I came across this graphic recently and I must say that I scratched my head over the FUN one:-

In my day as a Sefton Councillor we didn’t have a Department for Fun. How times change, but hang on what Fun is the Council actually providing? Well the recent council tax bill is very far from being fun:-((

Also, how jolly is the Cabinet Member who has Fun in their portfolio? And what about how the council is assessed for the level of fun it provides? Are all wards in the Borough meeting the minimum Fun criteria?

It’s a funny old world…………….

Lydiate – Cars for sale on the public highway

I’ve covered the issue of cars for sale on the public highway many times before on this blog site – Green Lane in Maghull comes to mind and here’s a link back to one my postings about it:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2018/09/16/maghull-sefton-takes-action-at-green-lane-over-11-years-of-car-sales/

But today I was contacted by a local resident who had noticed a reaction to a parked car for sale in the entrance to Seafore Close, a regular site from which car sales take place. I went to have a look and this is what I found:-

As a consequence I’ve raised the matter with Sefton Highways again to see what their current take on the matter is. If you have read the story of Green Lane Maghull (linked above) you will know how the Council eventually resolved the issue on that site.

Quote from my previous posting – ‘What it seemed to come down to was that Sefton Highways were saying that a car sales company could sell up to 2 vehicles in one location on the public highway and no one could stop it, or words to that effect.’

I’ll post again when there’s further news…..

Liverpool – Alfred Waterhouse, the city’s very own world famous architect

North Western Hotel – Liverpool

I stumbled across Waterhouse almost by chance having photographed a couple of the buildings he had a hand in – Rochdale Town Hall and Nottingham’s Prudential building – little did I realise that this prolific and famed architect was a son of Aigburth, Liverpool. Here’s what Wikipedia has to say about him:-

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_public_and_civic_buildings_by_Alfred_Waterhouse

And here are my shots of Rochdale Town Hall and Nottingham’s Prudential Building (warning the Nottingham shot includes the statue of a very unpopular man in Liverpool!) :-

Waterhouse designed the Tower after the original one was destroyed.

Prudential Building Nottingham designed by Waterhouse

The lead photo is, of course, Liverpool’s own North Western Hotel (now student accommodation) on Lime Street which Waterhouse designed – a quite magnificent building. And there are other buildings of his in Liverpool – The Royal Infirmary, Turner Memorial Home, Part of Newsham Park Hospital, The Prudential Assurance Building and The Victoria Building of Liverpool University.

Although he moved away from Liverpool at an early age I wonder why the City does not celebrate this most successful of architects who is probably best known as the designer in chief of the quite wonderful Natural History Museum in London. Indeed, I have only found one available book about his famous man and that’s with regard to his influences and work in the building the London Museum. Here’s a photo of the book:-

And one final thought. Is there a family connection between Alfred Waterhouse and the former Sykes Waterhouse Estate Agency based in Liverpool?

The lead photo is amongst my Flicker shots at:-

www.flickr.com/photos/86659476@N07/

Liverpool’s 1965 Shankland Plan

The Liverpool Echo has the article on its website – see link below:-

www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/business/gallery/eye-popping-walkways-sky-liverpool-15874583

This is an interesting piece of Liverpool’s history which the Echo has resurrected. It shows how different the thinking was back in the 1960’s about how a city should develop and radically change.

I guess we are grateful that much of it was not implemented.

Sefton Borough Council – Fly-tipping costs us all a fortune

The Liverpool Echo has a story about it on its website – see link below:-

www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/shameful-photos-show-disgusting-piles-15929007

I’ve had a good rant about this on many previous occasions and the problem is rampant across the country of course, so Sefton is sadly not in any way unique.

But what really gets me is that between Councils and the Environment Agency there’s far too little mobile covert CCTV coverage of sites where regular fly-tipping problems are the greatest. And I admit that in my time as a Sefton Councillor I failed to push the powers that be into more intelligent reactions to this ever seemingly worsening situation.

Regular convictions of fly-tippers in the local press would work wonders because it would deter others from following them. What makes the situation all the more ridiculous is that because of my cycling around Sefton and West Lancs I see what has been dumped and very often it is stuff that could easily be disposed of at local Recycling Centre at no cost at all! Yes I know there are those businesses tipping tyres, asbestos and indeed even the by-products to cannabis farms but much of what I see on my travels is ordinary household rubbish, furniture and building rubble and it strikes me that the dumpers are just too idle to take it to a Recycling Centre.

I realise that it would cost money to set up a mobile covert CCTV unit but surely the Councils across say Merseyside, working with the Environment Agency could put something in place which would eventually pay for itself by far less fly-tipped rubbish having to be removed from back alleys and country lanes. This is not rocket science surely, is it?

Rant over, for now……..

Aintree & Melling – Pen portraits of a community’s fallen heroes – 1914 – 1917

No sooner had I blogged about Lydiate’s fallen in World War 1 than Bill Honeyman got in touch to tell me about a similar project covering Aintree and Melling undertaken by two friends of mine Bill Borland and Peter Gill, what’s more Bill supplied me with a copy of their excellent booklet. Here’s a link to the Lydiate booklet blog:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2019/03/07/lydiate-and-its-great-war-1914-1918-a-lovely-remembrance-booklet/

The deaths of 81 servicemen from Aintree & Melling are attributed to the Great War

Many of the deaths are commemorated on memorials at St. Giles Church Aintree and St Thomas’ Church Melling including Henry Mattocks who died aged 21 on 13th October 1915. He worked at Melling Potteries and was a member of the Melling Brass Band. His name together with those of Michael May & Thomas Clark caught my attention because they all worked at in the now long gone Melling Pottery business. Some years ago when I was the leader of Sefton Council I was given a pamphlet-type book written by Irene Birch about her mother Bertha (Mattocks) Birch called A Melling Lassie “Pottery Days” Melling’s Scottish Heritage. In it on page 13 is an undated photo of Melling Pottery Band and I can’t help but wonder if Henry Mattocks is in that photo.

The vast majority of what we now know as Aintree Village was agricultural land back around the time of the Great War but I spotted a Richard Kirby who died aged just 19 on 14th November 1916. He was the son of Myles and Ellen Kirkby (nee Quick) of Aintree Lane. He died at the Somme and is buried at Bernafay Wood British Cemetery, Montauban, France.

This booklet is another great addition to the local history of the East Parishes part of Sefton Borough. My congratulations to the authors and thanks to Bill Honeyman for providing me with a copy.

We will remember them