Lydiate – Remembering the 96 and the 96 trees planted in memory of the fallen

Lydiate in Flower volunteers have recently been discussing how the part of Lambshear Lane Park where the 96 trees were planted by Lydiate Parish Council in memory of the fallen Liverpool fans at Hillsborough can be tidied up. I recalled the trees being planted and searched my back catalogue of blog postings. I found this from 2014:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2014/05/17/lydiate-parish-council-to-plant-96-trees-in-memory-of-hillsborough-victims/

I then went back to Dave Russell who as Chairperson of the Parish Council back in 2014 proposed that they be planted. Here’s what Dave had to say:-

‘The trees were planted in 2014 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the Hillsborough disaster. The trees were provided as whips, the groundsmen planted them without any occasion, as it was hoped to do something when we were satisfied that they had all taken. My idea was to involve the football teams who play on Sandy Lane, schools and the general community.’

Alas, by 2015 I was no longer on the Parish Council and this did not happen. It would be good to see something done.

We also planted an extension of the trees at Sandy Lane, people came and planted trees in memory of loved ones, it was agreed by the Council to call the area ‘The Jubilee Wood’, it would also be good if this area could be tidied, and perhaps its name erected?’

If anyone out there would like to get involved in any work that the LinF volunteers do with these 2 areas of the parks where the trees were planted please let me know. I’ll pass on the contcat details to LinF.

My thanks to Keith Jones for the lead to this posting

Kirkby – ‘Made on Merseyside’ Exhibition

This fascinating exhibition opens at Kirkby Gallery on Monday 23rd September and runs until 16th November. I blogged about it back in August and here’s a link to that posting:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2019/08/05/kirkby-made-on-merseyside-exhibition/

As I mentioned in my original piece the Frank Hornby Heritage Center, which is based within Maghull’s Meadows Leisure Centre, has loaned some items to the Hornby/Meccano part of the Made on Merseyside Exhibition. Indeed, this is the first time we have loaned out items to another exhibition.

The preview opening was yesterday evening and I went along to have a look taking my Merseyside Maritime Museum Assistant Curator daughter with me. We were genuinely impressed with what had been done with the Hornby/Meccano items loaned to Knowsley Council and of the wider exhibition which covers a number of historic and more modern day companies operating in Knowsley Borough and across Merseyside. Here’s a few photos of some of the other displays:-

These photos cover less than half of what’s included in the exhibition I might add.

One of its the aims is to teach local school children about the things that were once made locally and in some cases still are so bookings are available for school visits. All in all a great piece of work by Tina Ball of Knowsley Council and her volunteers.

And to close this posting another Binns Road, Liverpool Meccano factory product photo:-

Yes, it really is my old Meccano set which I donated to the Frank Hornby Trust a few years back. To find it on display at a public exhibition was a strange feeling when all I wanted to do was get into the case and start making something.

If you can get along to this great local exhibition to learn more about what was ‘Made on Merseyside’ then I hope that, like me, you’ll think it was time well spent.

Please click on the photos to enlarge them

Maghull – It’s Hornby Town

Maghull Station

Quite some years ago (February 2015 to be precise) I recall standing on Maghull Station with fellow Frank Hornby Trustee Les French, a rep from the Station Volunteers and a chap from Merseytravel. We were talking about making a story board for display on the station linking it to the life and works of world famous toy maker and Maghull’s most famous resident, Frank Hornby. A bit of back tracking on this blog site and I found what I said at the time. Here it is:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2015/02/02/maghull-promoting-frank-hornby-the-towns-most-famous-resident/

And the reason for mentioning it again now? Well the plan of February 2015 went nowhere for reasons I am not really aware of but it’s been one of those matters that from time to time I’ve promised to resurrect but then failed to follow through. So imagine my delight when I was contacted last week by a lady who’s one of the Station Volunteers and who’s clearly determined that the story board idea will see the light of day.

History board about Moss Side Hospital on the platform of the new Maghull North Station

I met said lady last Monday at the Frank Hornby Heritage Centre, within Meadows Leisure Centre, so she could photograph some of our display items which are normally behind glass. My understanding is that the plan is to put together boards akin to those at the new Maghull North Station which in that case tell the story of the work of the world famous Moss Side Hospital.

My very best wishes for the project, the Frank Hornby Trustees will be very pleased if it comes off this time around.

Altcar & Hillhouse Station

I’ve always been fascinated by the Southport & Cheshire Lines Extension Railway, which ran from Aintree Central Station to Southport Lord Street Station, and I’ve blogged about it many times before.

The other day I had the opportunity to purchase an old and undated photo of the former Altcar and Hillhouse Station on the line. I took the opportunity up and the photo is above:-

I should add that I do not know who, if anyone, holds the copyright to this photo but would be happy to acknowledge them if I receive information.

The station was the next one north of the former Lydiate Station, itself not in Lydiate but also in the Civil Parish of Great Altcar. Just north of the station was the junction with the Liverpool, Southport & Preston Junction Railway in effect a branch of the West Lancashire Railway. The next station on the S&CLER northwards being Mossbridge.

Altcar & Hillhouse Station opened in September 1884, it closed from January 1917 to April 1919 (due to the 1st WW) and closed altogether in January 1952 with the whole line closing in July 1952. However, whilst the line north of the station was lifted shortly after closure rail access from the Liverpool end was retained until 1960 to serve private sidings on the site of the station.

The road bridge visible in the photo is sit in situ and the trackbed is now a part of the Cheshire Lines/Trans Pennine Trail foot and cycle path.

Please click on the photo to enlarge it

Lydiate – It’s called ‘Yarn Bombing’ so I’m told

Yarn Bombing – ‘the action or activity of covering objects or structures in public places with decorative knitted or crotcheted material, as a form of street art’

If you live in Lydiate you may have noticed this:-

As seen on Southport Road, Lydiate

I spotted this on a recently refurbished (by Lydiate in Flower Volunteers) street bench next to a bus shelter. Across the road in the beautifully maintained gardens adjacent to the Nedens Lane junction a tree has also aquired a colourful addition made the same way.

I mentioned this to my daughter and it was she that told me it is called yarn bombing. Well I quite like it, although I have no idea who is doing it.

Southport – Its Victorian legacy has not been fully understood by modern custodians

Place North West has an interesting and thought provoking article on its website – see link below:-

www.placenorthwest.co.uk/news/my-place-southport/

In my view Southport suffers from two distinct and unique disadvantages. Firstly, of being at one far end of a Metropolitan Borough (Sefton) whilst being mostly surrounded by a County (Lancashire) it no longer (since 1974) has any significant political connections with. Secondly, of having some very poor road and rail connections to the east and north of it.

If you start from the premise that the modern custodians have failed then I feel the disadvantages which have been put in their way are very much the cause. What’s more they’ve not been self-created disadvantages but very much imposed ones from Beeching’s railway cut backs of the 1960’s, the lack of an Ormskirk road by-pass, and the reorganisation of local government in 1974. The fact that none of theses significant downsides for Sunny Southport have been successfully addressed is the ongoing challenge which the present day custodians can’t crack – although that’s not for the want of trying.

I’ve commented on this so tough to crack conundrum previously:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2019/01/06/southport-betting-on-a-bright-future-for-our-local-seaside-town/

My view is that Southport has been failed but the causes of that failure are very much external to the Town.

With thanks to Roy Connell for the lead to this posting