What the BBC can do – so sad that it’s news output in recent times has been so poor

The BBC has the article on its website – see link below:-

www.bbc.co.uk/news/stories-51636642

I’m no fan of the BBC’s news and current affairs output of recent years yet this piece on its website makes me realise how lost we’d been without the BBC. This is excellent writing by Kirstie Brewer and it makes me all the more sad that at times BBC news output is so superficial, unbalanced and seemingly biased towards politicians who seem to have a great deal of difficulty telling the truth.

Brexit exposed the BBC horribly and it’s coverage lacked the grit needed to expose the liars and snake oil salesmen, indeed at times it seemed that ‘Auntie’ believed them because of its lack of challenge.

That the BBC’s news current affairs and news output needs some significant work to bring it back to the standards it once had is a given for me but I’m no fan of destroying it. When you read quality journalism as in the link above you realise that there is hope for the Beeb.

Sobers couldn’t have done it without Nash

Surely cricket’s most famous day – 6 sixes in one over – see link below

www.bbc.co.uk/sport/av/cricket/45361645

I wonder how many times Malcolm Nash has related the story of how he was hit for 6 sixes? Notice Sobers having a fag whilst being interviewed! How times change……..

Here’s a link all about Sobers:-

www.trentbridge.co.uk/trentbridge/history/players/sir-garfield-sobers.html

As a Nottinghamshire lad Sobers, Randall and Larwood are my cricketing heroes……….

Sefton Coastline – One of 5 of the most picturesque Irish Sea coastal spots

The BBC has the article on its website – see link below:-

www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/p7q8J67pGfsqy1VzRTk1sx/in-pictures-five-of-the-irish-sea-s-most-picturesque-coastal-spots

What it says about the Sefton coastline:- ‘A site of specific scientific interest, Sefton Coast stretches for 12 miles between Southport and the end of Crosby Beach. Environmental Scientist Tara Shine says: “It’s a remarkable piece of coastline, with beaches, mud flats, woodlands and an internationally-recognised sand dunes habitat forming a barrier between the sea and the towns of Southport and Formby.”

Formby Point

Bird spotters, dog walkers and adventure sports enthusiasts alike love this stretch of coast, but its incredible sand dunes, which represent 20% of all the sand dunes in England, are retreating at a rate of three metres a year, as coastal erosion threatens the entire area. Kate Martin, from the National Trust, manages the area and says Formby is still naturally protected: “Sand dunes are amazing as a sea defence, as they move and shift to face the threat.” And why are they so important? As well as protecting the town, the dunes protect the Formby forests, one of the last natural habitats of endangered red squirrels.’

A Red Squirrel – What could be more symbolic of Formby and Little Altcar

The photos above are my own I might add.

Liverpool – Poshest pub toilets in England get listed

The BBC has the article on its website – see link below:-

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-51397915

I’m grateful to Keith Page for bringing this to my attention not least because I’ve just finished re-reading Bill Bryson’s wonderful book Notes from a Small Island.

‘And so, soon afterwards, I found myself, like all fresh arrivals in Liverpool, in the grand and splendourous surroundings of the Philharmonic, clutching a pint glass and rubbing shoulders with a happy Friday-evening throng.’

Port of Liverpool and Brexit – Some interesting questions & big challenges

Stena Precision at Birkenhead *

The BBC has the article on its website – see link below:-

www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-51329176

The Mersey – Looking from Bootle over the River to the Wirral

Of course, if the Port of Liverpool succeeds in gaining more trade the consequences swing back to that very knotty problem of land transport access to the Port, the over-capacity of the A5036 (Port to Switch Island road link), the lack of capacity of the rail link to the port (plus poor/limited regional rail capacity) and the new road proposed to be built through Rimrose Valley Country Park.

Rimrose Valley Country Park in the foreground and the Port cranes in the background.

Regionalism – Brown is right, shame he did not take it on board when in power though

The BBC has the article on it website – see link below:-

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-51178628

I often think of Gordon Brown in a similar way to ex-US President Jimmy Carter, far more impressive out of power than when he was in it. But seriously this is a big issue and Brown, if belatedly, is hitting the right nail on the head. Regionalism has been at the heart of Liberal thinking for generations so of course he is right to start to champion it in England.

This, a direct quote from the BBC article, is pure Liberalism – “We have to give more power to people in the communities and in the localities and the regions. We have a far too over-centralised state based in one part of the country – an administrative, political and financial centre that excludes power from people out in the regions.”

And yes I accept that Labour did bring in regional government for Scotland and Wales as a positive step forward but to have stopped there was a mistake, a big mistake. If more powers had been devolved to the regions of England we may not now be in the sorry sate that we are. And no I’m not talking up City Region Mayors, they are just sticking plasters over the wounds of our great cities. Their powers are both concentrated in the hands of one person (wrong in my book) and too few to make much difference anyway.

I hope Labour takes up Gordon’s liberalising agenda.

With thanks to Roy Connell for the lead to this posting