‘The police have better things to do than’………

This is probably a phrase that many of us have used when we’ve heard about an incident which is either of no consequence to us or is one we regularly participate in but which is actually against some law or regulation.

So when we say it are we in reality saying ‘well I would break that law too’ or ‘that law should be abolished because I regularly break it’; is it actually simply an expression of our frustration or even selfishness? Let’s see what you think the Police ‘have better things to do than’ – here are 5 examples:-

Enforcing speed limits?
Stopping pavement parking by drivers?
Tackling cyclists who ride on pavements?
Prosecuting motorists with no Road Tax or insurance?
Fining people who break ‘lockdown’ rules?

I could go on, but I think you’ll have got my drift by now i.e. if we park on pavements we won’t want the police/local council to enforce the regulations on it will we? However, if we are a pedestrian/blind/disabled/or pushing a pram we probably will want them to. The same applies to the other ‘crimes’ I’ve listed and indeed potentially many that I’ve not.

In short we’ll often be affronted by the anti-social/criminal behaviours of others whilst conveniently ignoring our own less than community minded activities. Indeed, can we sit on both sides of the fence by for example grumbling about the vehicle on the pavement when we’ve had to step into the road to get around it whilst dumping our own car on any pavement available when we want to park close to the chippy, hairdressers, chemist etc. etc.? The answer, of course, is yes we can!

Oh and one final thing, why are many of the things we can react to in this way associated with travel and how we go about it?

Lydiate/Maghull – Pavement parking and people with disabilities don’t mix

The Liverpool Echo has the story on its web site – see link below:-

www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/disabled-man-shames-pavement-parkers-15096662

Often vehicle drivers can be very selfish as they don’t think about or in some cases even care about the consequences of where and how they park cars and vans. But sometimes it will be unthinking and the motorist will be horrified when they realise they have made the life of someone with a disability even worse.

But how anyone can abuse a person with a disability who has had to point out that a vehicle is ether blocking their driveway or stopping them getting along a pavement is beyond belief to me. And anyway, why on earth would any driver block any driveway (other than their own); surely that can only be done as a deliberate act can’t it?

The same day that the Echo article was pointed out to me I had walked along Liverpool Road North in Maghull and noticed two problems where vehicles and other obstacles had been placed on the pavement. Firstly I saw 2 ‘A’ type-boards and a car across the very wide pavement opposite the Coach and Horses Pub – I could negotiate them but what would a wheelchair user or blind person do? And then just a bit further down the same road I came across a very narrow section of pavement where a couple of cars had been parked on it. It would have been a very right squeeze for a wheelchair user but oddly the road is very wide at this point so for the life of me I could not even work out why the drivers had felt the need to bump up the pavement.

A know three active local people with disabilities, one in a wheelchair and two who are partially sighted and they must come up against things placed on the pavement each and every day. All I and indeed they ask for is a little thought for those who are less fortunate; please keep pavements clear of obstacles whether they be cars, ‘A’ boards or anything else.

With thanks to Keith Page for the lead to this posting

PS. It’s also worth noting that people with prams and pushchairs will also encounter difficulties with items abandoned on pavements.