Cycling – Bad drivers & poor dog owners

Did you know that the new Highway Code is likely to say that a driver should leave 1.5m between their vehicle and a cyclist when overtaking and that the Police may well be encouraged to take drivers to task, even penalise them, for not adhering to this change?

The change is coming about because a small minority of drivers are putting cyclists at risk by passing far too close when overtaking. Most drivers pass well away from cyclists but some don’t care and pass cyclists in a very dangerous way. I’ve had a couple of bad experiences recently when cycling and oddly both were on Winifred Lane in Aughton, the latest one being a few days ago. This later time the vehicle was identifiable so I’ve contacted the firm (name not mentioned here) concerned asking them to speak to their driver:-

‘I was cycling on Winfred Lane in Aughton around 12.20 today when one of your vehicles nearly had me off my bike by passing far too close to me.

I could tell what was going to happen as the driver made little or no attempt to slow down as they tried to squeeze between me and a parked lorry on the other side of the road.

The new Highway Code says that vehicles should pass leaving 1.5m between them and a cyclist, I doubt there was 6 inches in this encounter! Can you please identify your driver and have words with them. I look forward to your reply.’

Here’s a link to a recent newspaper article about overtaking a cyclist and the changes coming to the Highway Code:-

www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/overtaking-cyclists-mots-the-law-1944067

The other big danger to cyclists are dogs. On the amusing side of things I’ve been told by owners ‘he does not like hats’, ‘he does not like cyclists’, ‘he does not like bright colours’ etc. etc. as though training their dog is something they’ve just never thought of. But joking aside passing a dog and dog walker when the dog is on one of those extendable leads is an art form as you have to try to guess what the dog will do i.e. which way it will run and how far. This is an issue you don’t even need to think about when a dog is on a traditional lead as they can’t move very far in any direction. The problem is most obvious on pedestrian and cycling ‘shared space’ routes

And before you ask yes I’ve been chased by a dog whilst cycling but fortunately, I managed to outpace it, so I’m yet to have an accident or be bitten by a dog whilst cycling. However, I have been bitten by one whilst a pedestrian. That ended up in court and the person responsible for the dog got a £300+ fine if I recall correctly. It happened a few years back in Thornton. My advice to anyone who has an unfortunate dog encounter is to report it to Sefton Council’s Dog Warden, that’s how my case got taken to court.

Chester the Chocolate Lab

Oh and before you think I’m a dog hater, no I’m not. Chester, a friend’s Chocolate Lab’, is my best doggy chum and yes our family has in the past had a dog. To be honest the dog is never the problem it’s the owners who don’t train them whilst treating them like children who can do no wrong. Dogs are pack animals and need to know where they stand. If you treat them like they are the top dog that is how they will act making your and other folks lives a misery in the process often.

* Thanks to ukcyclelaws blogspot for the graphic above

Highway Code to be beefed up to help cyclists

The BBC has the story on its web site – see link below

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-45900806

I’m a driver and a cyclist so I can see things from both sides of the divide. That some drivers are inconsiderate and dangerous is a given but so are some cyclists who jump red lights just like the mad drivers. In many ways they are likely to be the same people i.e. if you drive through red lights you probably cycle through them as well. The bottom line is that there is a section of the cycling population who are as much a pain and danger to the travelling public as there bad drivers.

One of my big bugbears is vehicles overtaking me and getting far to close, almost brushing past me. And yes I do shout my opinion at such drivers who are usually doing this dangerous stunt because they are in too much of a hurry and can’t give a cyclist a wide enough berth due to traffic on the other carriageway. To combat this, where the road is narrow, I move out further into the road to stop vehicles trying to pass me.

You are always wary of opening vehicle doors as so many motorists just don’t look and some don’t even care, taking the attitude that other vehicles will just have to go around their open door. Of course the daft and the selfish, together with the distracted, do this to cyclists as well as other vehicles. In my experience young men are the worst for doing this and often they could not give a toss but I lost a cycling friend in Southport because someone opened a car door just as he was passing by a car.

Cycling at rush hour, particularly the evening rush hour, is the worst in my experience because drivers become manic when trying to get home and some think they are driving guided missiles. As more and more people start to cycle these days how we drive on our roads will have to change and that’s why these Highway Code updates are on the cards.

When I’m driving I always try to keep in mind that pedestrians and cyclists are more important and far more vulnerable than I am in my enclosed warm bubble of a car.

Here’s a link to how Cycling UK views the proposed changes to the Highway Code:-

www.cyclinguk.org/press-release/cycling-uk-celebrates-governments-major-step-towards-improved-cycle-safety