Assemblies for all: A new inclusive alternative to collective worship

I’m pleased to see Humanists UK take this common sense approach to challenge religious based collective worship which is supposed to be followed by schools – Yes I realise that many of them don’t/find a way around it.

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Humanists UK say – Schools wanting to deliver inclusive assemblies instead of collective religious worship can now access a groundbreaking new resource featuring hundreds of inclusive assemblies.
Assemblies for All is a brand-new project by Humanists UK providing schools and teachers access to more than 200 high-quality, inclusive assemblies which welcome all pupils regardless of their religious or non-religious background.

The assemblies have been developed by organisations such as Amnesty International, WaterAid, and the BBC, covering themes such as the environment, physical and mental health, arts and culture, and religious and secular holidays.

Teachers can now draw upon hundreds of assemblies that are not acts of collective worship and which do not seek to promote one particular religion or belief, offering truly inclusive and welcoming assemblies to their pupils.

I hope the resource offered above will be of interest to teachers and that they will want to follow it up.

Religion – Young folk are turning their back on it

Click on the chart to enlarge it

Evan I, as an atheist, was surprised by these stats. Our world is changing very fast indeed but of course it also begs the question as to what religion and its more acceptable values are being replaced with. You see whilst being an atheist I do appreciate that many religious folk do a lot of good particularly in terms charitable works.

Our society needs values to aspire to yet I fear it is becoming more selfish and insular whilst losing its religion. This is both a challenge and an opportunity.

Religion in Schools – Time for a fundamental change

I can’t be doing with religious teaching in schools of whatever kind.

Surely we are grown up enough in 2016 to leave youngsters to decide for themselves, when they are old enough, if they want to be religious and if so what religion they want to follow.

Schools are for teaching children life and employability skills not for indoctrinating them to believe whatever religious beliefs their parents may hold.

By all means, as part of broadening the minds of young people, teach them what the major religions of the world believe in and why, but also teach them about Humanism and Atheism too. That way they can go out into the world with clear and open minds adopting or not adopting a religion as they see fit.

Today is World Humanist Day

Today is World Humanist Day, a day of celebration set up in the 1990s. Humanism is not a religion. It is a world view based on secular values, common to any person regardless of nationality, race, culture, sexuality, gender or background. Its ethos is captured in the phrase – nothing to die for, everything to live for.

Humanism is growing across the world and often people lead a humanist life without realising it. The Guardian reported last month that, for the first time, in England and Wales those who identify as non-religious now outnumber Christians.

Sadly, many people still suffer stigma and discrimination for rejecting religion. In some countries atheism is illegal with secularists abused and killed for their lack of belief. Even in more moderate nations like the UK it can still be very difficult for atheists to ‘come out’ for fear of rejection by religious family members or colleagues.

Humanism looks to build a more humane society based on ethical values in a spirit of equality, enquiry and human achievement. Answers are found through science and human rendezvous not the supernatural. At its heart is the recognition that we get one life and everyone should be able to live it in peace.

So all of us atheists are humanists I presume whether we realise it or not. I have been an atheist for 40 years now and should you want to find out more about how one man lost his religion try reading Ludovic Kennedy’s book All in the Mind: A farewell to God.