Building the Mersey Tunnels

The Art Deco portal to Queensway the first Mersey Tunnel

www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/17-deaths-250-tonnes-explosive-13696923

The Liverpool Echo has the story on its web site – see link above

These are the tickets my family were given when we walked through the new (2nd) Tunnel in 1971, the day before it opened to vehicles.

This is the front page of the booklet produced to celebrate of the opening of Kingsway Tunnel in 1971.

I have always been fascinated by the Mersey Tunnels, their history and how they were constructed. This Liverpool Echo article gives an interesting insight into both of them.

Liverpool – It’s 60 years since it lost its trams

Had a great day out yesterday with Keith Page reliving the age of the tram at Wirral Transport Museum where they were celebrating the 60th anniversary of the running of Liverpool’s Last Tram.

Sadly Liverpool no longer has any tram tracks so celebrating the 60th anniversary there was a non-runner. But over the water on the Wirral about a mile of track was relayed in modern times for the heritage trams of their Transport Museum and Merseyside Tramway Preservation Society to run on.

As part of the celebrations a 1950’s street scene was recreated on Pacific Road with Liverpool’s recently rebuilt tramcar 245 (owned by National Museums Liverpool) and other heritage road vehicles.

Here are some photos from the well attended event:-

1950’s Street Scene on Pacific Road, Birkenhead

1950’s Street Scene on Pacific Road, Birkenhead – An alternative view

‘Baby Grand’ Tramcar 245 at Woodside Ferry Terminal.

The first photo is also amongst my Flickr shots at:-

www.flickr.com/photos/86659476@N07/

Well done to all the organisers and exhibitors it was well done and well worth their efforts.

St. Lukes Church (the bombed out church) – Liverpool

www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/seven-things-you-probably-dont-13028821

The Liverpool Echo has the story on it web site – see link above

There’s been a lot of talk in recent times about how to give this iconic symbol of Liverpool in the Blitz a sustainable future. On a personal level though I can’t escape the story of what happened on the night the incendiary bomb hit St. Lukes and the fact that I had the privilege to talk with a person who was fire watching that night and saw it happen. My previous posting from 2010 refers:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2010/11/16/uncle-albert-he-saw-the-bombing-of-liverpool-from-a-birds-eye-view-point/

Sadly ‘Uncle Albert’ died earlier this year but whenever I see St. Lukes or hear of it I think of that brave young chap (who became one of my best mates in his mid 70’s until he passed away aged 95) standing atop George Henry Lees fire watching as Liverpool was being destroyed all around him

Liverpool – A trip on a City Explorer tour bus

Last week Sheila and I decided to do what tourists do when they visit Liverpool and the day we chose (by chance) happened to coincide with the huge cruise liner Caribbean Princess calling into Liverpool.

There were unsurprisingly a lot of foreign visitors around Albert Dock when we met our City Explorer tour bus (run by Maghull Coaches) in Gower Street and they were also boarding it like us.

We went to sample the tour because our friend Phil Marshall is a qualified tour guide on this fleet of buses. Phil is a partially sighted chap from Maghull who has gained mentions before on this blog site due to issues he has encountered as a blind person. He was with his new guide dog Harvey, a lovely golden Retriever.

The tour lasted just under an hour with Phil doing the running commentary from his perch on the upstairs deck. He was as humorous and well informed as I expected him to be and clearly his words went down well with the passengers. Here’s Phil with Harvey at the end of the tour:-

The Liverpool weather was not kind to us during the tour but Phil made us all laugh and we certainly learned things we did not know about Liverpool. The trip is to be recommended.

Merseyrail – It’s 40 years since Liverpool’s underground was completed

Who would have thought it was 40 or more years since we lost Exchange Station and indeed the overground Central Station in Liverpool for them to be replaced with new underground stations. Not forgetting of course that Liverpool had been blessed with an underground railway from the Wirral for many years prior to that – The Mersey Railway.

An old Mersey Railway tinplate sign which is on display at the National Railway Museum in York

And here’s what the new underground network looked like when completed in 1977. The Northern Line (Blue) was subsequently extended from Garston to a new terminus at Hunts Cross.

Click on the photo’s/graphics to enlarge them

The beauty of Liverpool’s former Martins Bank Building

www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/first-look-inside-derelict-martins-13266301

The Liverpool Echo has the story on its web site – see link above

Quote from the article – ‘The giant Water Street landmark was built by Liverpool-based Martins Bank to become an iconic headquarters. It is one of the greatest buildings of its era surviving in Britain.’

This is a magnificent building and we must hope that a sensitive process of turning from a bank into a hotel will make the building once more accessible and of use in the present day.

I recall that when I first came to live in Maghull’s Sefton Lane in 1968 our next door neighbours (who lived at No.29) were an elderly couple called Jones and Ernest had been an employee of Martins Bank. I was only about 10 at the time but recollect that on a couple of occasions the sadly housebound Ernest, who died within a couple of years, would talk to me about his working life with Martins Bank. I wonder if any other Maghullians knew him?