‘Life on Board’ Exhibition at Mersey Maritime Museum

Yesterday we went to have a look at this new exhibition which has recently been put tpgether by curators at Merseyside Maritime Museum. I say recently but it should have opened back in March however a certain lockdown stopped that happening. But with the relaxation of Covid 19 rules the exhibition indeed the Museum itself is now open for public viewing again, although it’s wise to pre-book your visit. It’s all free I might add.

‘Life on Board’ is a look into the lives of both crew and passengers of merchant ships and passenger vessels and it tells a story, indeed many individual stories, via the people who experienced work and travel by ship over many decades.

Now having been shown around this new exhibition by our daughter (one of the team behind it) means that my view of it must be biased; that said both Sheila and I really did find it fascinating and well worth the visit. What’s more, clearly great thought has been given into trying to keep visitors and staff safe during this awful pandemic.

I’m no maritime historian so the best way I can illustrate the exhibition is via the photos I took while at it. So here goes:-

There’s quite a bit about the loss of this ship including video interviews. So sad but the families got to the truth in the end thankfully.

The medal above was interesting to see as I’d blogged about Samuel Plimsoll a while back – Here’s a link to that posting:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2018/06/21/plimsoll-the-man-the-mp-and-the-line/

I picked this shot of a Harrison Line poster due to it’s connection with my former home town of Maghull – Historic England says – Harrison Home [at the junction of Sefton Ln & L’pool Rd Sth] was named after Frederic Harrison, the President of the [Maghull] Homes in 1902 who operated a shipping line out of Liverpool. The home was constructed by Brown and Backhouse at a cost of £5421 and opened in June 1902.

To add to the photo above my Mum worked at the Harrison Home in the 1970’s and early 1980’s and I recall going into the building (which is Listed) at the time and thinking how beautiful it was and indeed still is. The Maghull Homes, as it was then known, was an epileptic colony and this was one of their buildings, it’s now known as the Parkhaven Trust.

I took a lot more photos as the exhibition covers many shipping issues and matters but the ones I’ve picked for this review are those which particularly interested me. Of course, other aspects will be of greater interest to others so if this review has piqued your interest it’s best to go see the the exstensive collection for yourself – I’m sure you’ll not be disappointed.

Please click on the photos above to enlarge them.

Maghull – Update on Stafford Moreton Way & Woodend environmental projects

Here’s an update on two significant Maghull environmental projects which are presently being pursued by the Friends of Maghull & District and which I thought were worth shouting about. I don’t have any direct involvement in either project [only so many hours in each day:-)] so any queries are best directed to Frank Sharp – woodendcwp@gmail.com – who leads on these matters.

Here’s the update:-

Thank you very much for your kind past support towards the ongoing Stafford Moreton Way Wildflower Project in 2019/20. We would like to take the opportunity to provide an update and to encourage you to support our latest project which is currently at 97% of its target total, leaving an outstanding £678.

Firstly, we hope you have been coping with the pandemic challenges and that our letter finds you in good spirits.

The Stafford Moreton Way Wildflower Project had two stages: (1) November 2019 involved removing turf in three areas and planting mixed wildlife friendly hedging, 12 trees, 1500 bulbs, covered with bark chippings as a weed suppressant, and (2) in April 2020 we had to postpone the installation of the recycling rhinoceros sculpture, the wildflower turf, and noticeboard, due to the pandemic restrictions. We are hoping to lay the turf on the 22.9.20, install the rhinoceros in October/November and following this install the noticeboard. We have had a terrific response from the community in collecting the plastic bottle tops for the recycling rhinoceros particularly from three local primary schools, the children of which we hope will proudly unveil the statue and insert the bottle tops. We had some small teething problems with the maintenance on site as London and Cambridge Property Management’s subcontractors (Marshalls) were unable to work during the pandemic and then this was compounded by new subcontractors (Spacecare) who were initially not fully briefed of their responsibilities which we hope to resolve this week. Continued updates are still available on our website at www.spacehive.com/stafford-moreton

The Woodend Community Woodland Project – www.spacehive.com/woodend – , is at Bobby’s Wood situated at the junction of Liverpool Road South and Northway, across the road from Lidl and the Alt pub and neighbouring Bumbles Children’s Nursery.

Rationale.

We are conscious that developers are seemingly keen to build everywhere in Maghull at the moment despite planning refusals by Maghull and Sefton Council’s Eg Damfield Lane was a blue plaque preservation area but central government overturned their refusals and the land is currently being built on. Consequently, we want to preserve the natural beauty of Bobby’s Wood but make it more user-friendly by improving upon the handful of dog walkers that currently use it. To achieve this we have focused on creating a (1) safe hedging and rail perimeter and (2) an accessible natural Cotswold path, which will be the springboard for all the other proposed natural improvements.

We developed the proposals earlier this year, consulted a variety of horticultural experts and stakeholders. Spent July undertaking a survey open to the whole of Maghull and also focused on door knocking on over 600 houses in the vicinity and received overwhelming support as can be seen in the online survey report, including Q&A and information sheets available at http://www.maghull-tc.gov.uk/news The survey also amazingly resulted in 30 respondents expressing an interest in becoming volunteers as part of a Friends of Bobby’s Wood group.

We started crowdfunding in April 2020 and will finish in late October 2020. By some miracle, during the incredible pandemic challenges for everyone, we have somehow raised £22,913 which is incredibly humbling and also perhaps an indication of how refocused people are now about nature. If we over fund we are targeting the first £3000 on populating the huge rear borders with community engaged planting.

We have provided further introductory information below and have created an introductory video on the crowdfunding website at www.spacehive.com/woodend

We hope you can help again with this new project and thank you once again for your past and hopefully future motivational support.

Best Wishes and Take Care,

Frank Sharp (Friends of Maghull and District).

Extra Information.

To reinvigorate an historic woodland entrance to Maghull, with a welcoming, accessible, iconic and engaging wildlife friendly space, focusing on enhancing the environment, history, community, legacy and economy.

Our Ambition.

Between April and October 2020, we are initially targeting funding to create a safe and accessible area as a platform for community led projects for years to come. This involves (1) ‘accessible’ 230m pathway (cost £6,500) for dis/abled, prams, elderly, to join together various future destinations that will eventually include the following:

RHS mentored community led designed and managed planted borders

Under-planting current trees with hundreds of free Mersey Forest donated tree whips and bulbs to future proof and enhance.

A 6m banqueting table and benches near Bumbles Nursery to act as a fun picnic table and community hub.

A wisteria arched tunnel

Signage to welcome and inform regarding the rich history (remnant of a 2×5 mile mediaeval wood belonging to a Saxon called Uctred referred to in the Domesday book (1086)).

The potential loan of a 15 foot Saxon warrior sculpture.

Our other initial target is to purchase and install (2) 92 m of diamond rail fencing (cost £4500) around the perimeter for the following reasons:

To protect the beautiful 1385 wildlife friendly mixed hedging whips we are obtaining from the Tree Council for free, that will form the 230m perimeter and will be planted in November 2020, during National Tree Week with the support of every aspect of the community eg local nursery, two primary schools, one high school, the local Scout groups and U3A etc.

To protect children and pets from directly accessing the busy roads

To provide habitat and food for wildlife, whilst providing a beautiful appearance.

To provide research evidence on how hedging can reduce 60% of the vehicle pollution, produced by the daily 20,000 vehicles, conducted between Sefton Council, the Tree Council and a professor & his team from Bangor University.

To protect from vehicle pollution and noise.

Through the planting activity we want to establish a specific friends of community group to care and support the wood.

Meccano – An introduction & a visit too if you wish

The Frank Hornby Heritage Centre within Maghull’s Meadows Leisure Centre.

As a Trustee of the Maghull based charitable group the Frank Hornby Trust I found the introductory video – linked below – from Sharon Brown (National Museums Liverpool’s Land Transport Curator) very useful.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bmwqnENVdA

As a 60+ year old I can of course remember Meccano, Dinky Toys & Hornby Railways very well but younger folk may not, so the video may help connect younger generations with a huge piece of both Liverpool’s history and the toys of previous generations of their own family too.

Another view of the Frank Hornby Heritage Centre.

The Frank Hornby Heritage Centre, which is within Maghull’s Meadows Leisure Centre, is presently open to visit each Tuesday and Friday (10am to 4pm) but only with a previously made booking. This is of course due to Covid 19 restrictions. If you want to visit please e-mail t3robertson@gmail.com so that a visiting slot can be arranged.

Frank Hornby lived for most of his aldult life in Maghull on Merseyside. His 1st house (The Hollies) in Station Road has an English Heritage Blue Plaque on it and his 2nd house (Quarry Brook) which is now the 6th Form block of Maricourt High School a Maghull Town Council plaque.

Maghull & Lydiate’s ‘Berlin Wall’ & the ‘Bible’ of cycling infrastructure

In response to a previous posting about cycling infrastructure in Sefton Borough a Twitter responder (Clive Durdle) pointed me (and indeed Sefton Council) towards something called CROW. Yes, I wondered what it was too but after some Googling I realised it’s pretty much the ‘Bible’ for building cycle friendly/safe roads. And surprise, surprise (NOT) it’s a Dutch publication.

Here’s a blog posting about it:-

therantyhighwayman.blogspot.com/2019/07/crow-flow.html

And here’s a link to the publishers – by gum it’s not cheap!

crowplatform.com/product/design-manual-for-bicycle-traffic/

The new Alt JUnction

Of course, the obvious question is what manual were Sefton Council using when they designed the new junction in Maghull – A59/Northway-Liverpool Road South-Dover Road (The Alt Junction) – as I struggle to see how cycling through this brand new junction was considered at all! Frankly, I’ve yet to hear a good word about it from the pedestrians, cyclists or drivers whom I’ve spoken to. Yes, I realise it’s new and we generally don’t like change so we’re often sceptical about many new things, but this junction could start to become almost as unpopular as its much bigger brother just a few hundred yards away from it – I refer of course to the now infamous Switch Island ‘Home of traffic Accidents’.

The reason this new junction is important is because there are few crossing places across Maghull & Lydiate’s ‘Berlin Wall’ otherwise known as the A59/Northway dual carriageway (and even fewer safe ones) for pedestrians and cyclists. These are they south to north:-

* South end of Maghull adjacent to River Alt – A good pedestrian/cyclist safe crossing with traffic lights.
* The Alt Junction – Brand new but in my view far from being cyclist friendly & it’s a long walk for pedestrians.
* Hall Ln Junction – Pedestrians have high-level bridge to cross but it’s disability/cyclist unfriendly(steps).
* Damfield Ln Junction – Another high-level safe walking bridge but it’s disability/cyclist unfriendly (steps again).
* Westway/Eastway Junction – A pedestrian subway which cyclists are discouraged/banned from using.**
* Dodds Ln Junc’ – A good pedestrian crossing with traffic lights separate to the non-traffic lighted junction.
* Kenyons Ln Junction – Traffic lighted but no pedestrian phase & lights often do not recognise waiting cyclists.
* Robins Island – Traffic island with no pedestrian crossing facilities or safe access onto cycle paths.

The distance between the most southerly A59 crossing and Robins Island is @2.25 miles the vast majority of which is through two highly populated suburban communities, except the Kenyons Ln – Robins Island section. What’s more a large proportion of community facilities – Town Hall, Leisure Centre, Library, Frank Hornby Museum, Police Station, Health Centre, Industrial Estate, Recycling Centre, Main Shopping Centre and Lydiate Village Centre – are all on the western side of it. Maghull’s 2 railway stations being on the east side together with 2 of the 3 local high schools*. My point being, there are many reasons why Maghull & Lydiate folk have to cross this busy major road each and every day and the crossing facilities for pedestrians and cyclists are far from adequate.

We all know we should be walking and cycling more to help us to be fitter/healthier and of course to save the planet but the way Maghull & Lydiate has been set up/planned in effect encourages vehicle use simply because of the lack of safe/accessible crossing facilities associated with it’s very own ‘Berlin Wall’.

On that basis why has the most recently rebuilt junction on ‘The Wall’ been built with cycling facilities all but excluded? Has Sefton Council got a copy of CROW and if so is it simply gaining dust on a shelf in some out of the way storeroom?

* The local primary schools are split 4 on the east side, 5 on the west

** The pedestrian only subway looks like this:-

It could be adapted for pedestrians and cyclists like this one in York:-

I would be interested to hear what others think about shared space subways in cycling unfriendly Maghull, Sefton Borough or elsewhere.

Maghull – The Albany Cinema, The Beatles & Lidl

The article on the Guardian/Observer website – linked below – caught my eye because it involves the Beatles and Lidl:-

www.theguardian.com/culture/2020/aug/30/threatened-beatles-cinema-needs-a-lidl-help-from-its-friends?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

The former Albany Cinema in Maghull, which was renamed twice to Astra and then Apollo, closed many years ago but its link with the article above is that when demolished it became and still is a Lidl store and that the Beatles also played there in the 1960’s.

This photo is of my old friend Jim Byrne, who is sadly no longer with us, at the then derelict site of the former Albany Cinema prior to its demolition.

The link below takes you to a Maghull & Lydiate U3A document which covers Maghull’s local blue plaque scheme. If you scroll through it you’ll reach the section about the Beatles plaque on the present Lidl building which celebrates the Beatles appearing at the Albany Cinema:-

www.maghull-scene.co.uk/docs/Maghull%20and%20Lydiate%20U3A_Blue%20Plaques.pdf

And finally, how apt bearing in mind what this blog posting is about – the Beatles liveried Merseyrail train at Maghull Station:-

Cycling – Nothing for Sefton’s East Parishes again

Me in my cycling gear looking grumpy over the lack of investment in Sefton’s cycling infrastructure.

Being a regular cyclist I often talk about the deficiencies in the cycling network in Sefton Borough’s East Parishes – Aintree Village, Melling, Lydiate, Maghull & Sefton/Lunt Villages – so when I came across the article linked below my eyes light up, if only just a little. And by just a little I mean that’s related to the the small amount of money on the table – £2m will fund very little in terms of safe cycling. Have a look at the article:-

lbndaily.co.uk/work-begins-mersey-pop-walking-cycling-routes/

Yes you’ve probably picked up on the very same issue that I did i.e. nothing for the East Parishes part of Sefton Borough what so ever! To save you going back to the article this is what it says will be done in Sefton Borough:-

Sefton: Cycle route through Southport town centre, segregated cycle route from Bootle town centre to Liverpool city centre.

And you know just relatively small investments in the cycling network in the East Parishes would bring some benefits. I blogged about a few of these not so long ago in the Maghull, Melling & Lydiate area:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2020/05/03/maghull-lydiate-melling-simple-cycling-fixes-for-sefton-council-to-undertake/

When will Sefton Council invest in the Cycling infrastructure of the East Parishes to sort out the simple missing links that are already sat there never mind getting down to serious cycle facility investment in the forgotten part of our Borough? Yes I know a new cycle path is being built from the M58 ‘Ashworth’ junction in Melling to Kirkby and there’s also been a recent ‘half hearted’ attempt to bring a cycle path into Maghull along the A59 from Switch Island but that’s about it for the East Parishes of the Borough.

Glad I got that off my chest…….