Maghull Wind Orchestra

Our very own local orchestra was today playing a Christmas concert to a packed house at Sefton Park’s wonderful Palm House

What’s more, they got a standing ovation. Their concerts seem to go from strength to strength as their reputation spreads far and wide. well done yet again Maghull Wind Orchestra.

Maghull North Station – Tribute to the fallen and the suffering

I went along to the still new Maghull North Station (on Merseyrail’s Northern Line to Ormskirk) today to have a look at the just installed piece of artwork which celebrates the work of the former Moss Side Hospital and its pioneering treatment of shell shock. Of course, the hospital is long gone and the new Poppy Fields Housing Estate now occupies the site.

Here are some shots of what I think is a quite striking piece of artwork which is sited adjacent to the station ticket office:-

It was unveiled by local historian and former Maghull GP Dr John Rowland who has published a number of books on the history of Maghull and Lydiate.

A fine tribute to Moss Side, its staff, doctors and indeed patients who benefited from its pioneering treatments during and after World War 1.

The 3rd photo is amongst my Flickr shots at:-

www.flickr.com/photos/86659476@N07/

Maghull – Downed trees at Central Square – Why?

I must admit to being shocked when I saw the felled trees yesterday at the junction of Liverpool Road Noth/Westway as they were a useful screen to the car park and buildings behind them. This is the scene I happened upon:-

Of course, it could be that the reason for the felling has passed me by and others know what it’s all about; I just happened to walk up Liverpool Road Road North on Sunday afternoon and saw this scene.

Thinking back to my days as a Sefton Councillor representing Maghull my memory is that when the previous owners of the Square created the car park on the land at the side of the former HSBC Bank that the trees which have now been felled were deliberately left in place to provide screening. It may even be the case that this was all part of the planning application/approval for the site to become a car park.

I’m a fully paid up tree hugger so any trees being felled upsets me. I would love to know what the felling is all about and why it was considered necessary. Presently, I look upon the scene as environmental vandalism!

Maghull – So what’s the Bryant House story?

Byant House, at the junction of Shop Lane and Liverpool Road North, used to be leased to Sefton Council who had an outpost of its Social Services Dept. in there and some other municipal functions. However, the Council moved out some years ago. Since then it’s really not had any occupancy at all although it has been touted for use as a children’s nursery and even a Wetherspoons Pub. The latter caused a real stir in the nearby community back in 2011 but of course, it never came to fruition.

The photo above was taken a few days ago and the building has looked like this for quite a while now with little if any sign of it being occupied – so what’s the back story? Answers on a postcard………..

Oh and by the way, when I came to live in Maghull back in 1968 this site was derelict and the ruins of the former Wadworths Butchers’ Shop were still clear to see. John Rowlands in his 1986 book Lydiate & Maghull in Times Past says of this site – ‘In about 1890 William Wadsworth moved from Northampton to take over the butcher’s business’ – ‘The building at the back was the slaughterhouse. Mr Wadsworth owned the field on the left of Shop Lane to graze sheep and cattle. The open area at the front faced the largest of the Maghull [canal] wharves know as Wadsworth’s Wharf’ – ‘Following her husband’s death in 1925 Mrs Wadsworth sold the business to Ernie Cobham’. I’m not sure when the butcher’s business closed down.

What goes around comes around with the site seemingly having no purpose again – unless you know better that is………….

Cycle Routes – They are generally poor

The BBC has the article on its website – see link below

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-46179270

As a cyclist, I find this article interesting and to the point. I’ve commented before along the similar lines by highlighting local cycle route inadequacies which I have encountered.

Often segregated cycle routes do not have logical ends and are in effect bits and pieces between destinations. The route from Switch Island to Ormskirk along the busy A59 is an example. From Switch Island to the Maghull boundary there’s a brand new cycle path but it stops well short of Liverpool Road South. Yes, I know that Sefton Council intends to address this but really it should have been done in tandem with Highways England doing the first stretch.

But then moving north through Maghull & Lydiate a safe cycle route has yet to be sorted out. It’s either the busy dual carriageway or pavement for cyclists.

A59 Cycle path becomes narrow pavement at Robins Island.

Then at Robins Island, a cycle path appears again, on both sides of the A59. Generally, it is in good condition but parts of it are not – patches of grass, poorly completed surface repairs & tree roots make the later stages of these cycle lanes poor. But then as you climb into Aughton the cycle route peters out altogether just like through Maghull & Lydiate. This makes the last mile or so into Ormskirk a cycling challenge.

This was the state of the Cheshire Lines Path through Great Altcar Civil Parish in the winter of 2017 – it’s not got any better.

I could illustrate other problem routes where cycling facilities in Sefton and West Lancashire are inadequate but will settle for just one. The Cheshire Lines Path/Trans Pennine Trail. This former railway track is in very poor condition through West Lancs because since it was created there has not been the regular maintenance that is clearly required. Some of the route is now really only suitable for mountain bikes and a once wide path where cyclists could pass each other is presently very narrow in places.

There is much to do to make our cycling routes safe, logical and well maintained.

With thanks to Roy Connell for the lead to this posting

Maghull Station – Rebuilding the Station Master’s House

After many years of decline, it looks like work has now started to rebuild Maghull Station’s Station Masters House as part of the redevelopment and house building project behind the Liverpool bound platform. Here’s a photo I took on Remembrance Day on my way into Liverpool:-

It’s said (by no lesser person than Les French Chairman of the Maghull based Frank Hornby Trust) that the railway buildings of Maghull Station were a probable inspiration for Maghull’s world-famous toy maker Frank Hornby who lived just yards away from the station and who caught the train to work there regularly. On that basis, the derelict Station Master’s house has sadly been an unfortunate stain on the Town’s character in recent years.

Here’s hoping for a more positive future for a historic railway building………