Waste, fly-tipping & The Cheshire Lines Path in Maghull

Right on the western edge of Maghull, there’s an industrial estate on one side of Sefton Lane and a waste disposal/recycling centre together with a garden centre and a few houses on the other. Leaving Maghull you go over a significant mound which is the remains of a railway bridge taking Sefton Lane over the former Southport & Cheshire Lines Extension Railway, now the Cheshire Lines Path/Trans Pennine Trail. You then pass by the industrial estate (on your left) and recycling centre & garden centre (on your right) before a small bridge takes you over Dovers Brook, which is the boundary between Maghull and Sefton Civil Parishes.

The area has two significant problems, flooding at times of heavy rain being the most obvious and well known one which I’ve blogged about many times. The other problem is less obvious unless you walk around the perimeter of the waste recycling centre which backs onto Dovers Brook and open countryside. The problem? Rubbish, waste, litter strewn around. Here’s a couple of photos I’ve taken recently:-

View of rear fence of Sefton Meadows Recycling Centre

Rubbish stewn along the eastern bank of Dovers Brook.

When you see the rubbish your first thought (or at least my first thought) is how did it get here? You see where it has been dumped is not close to Sefton Lane so it surely can’t be casual fly-tipping. Having visited the area, twice now, with other concerned local residents and an environmental officer of Sefton Council there’s a possibility that the waste is coming from within the recycling centre. Yes, I know at face value that may seem odd but one theory is that scavengers operating within the recycling centre, out of hours, may be dragging stuff out of the centre and sorting through it on the other side of the fence, taking what they find to be of value whilst leaving everything else.

The problem could do with getting to the bottom of with Merseyside Waste Disposal Authority (MWDA) and their site operator Veolia. If the waste is being brought from inside the recycling centre compound then shouldn’t MWDA/Veolia take action to collect it up on a regular basis? Again, if it is coming via the route suggested does this not mean a beefing up of security is required?

It will be interesting to see how the Sefton Council environmental officer gets on with her piece of detective work. She seemed keen to get to the bottom of the growing environmental mess around this area.

And then just yards away you can walk over to the Cheshire Line Path/Trans Penning Trail which is maintained by the Merseyside North Volunteers and you see the other and very much positive side of our local environment:-

Trans Pennine Trail V Tissington Trail

These two photographs tell a story and in the case of the Trans Pennine Trail, specifically the part of it through West Lancashire which is also known as the Cheshire Lines Path, it’s not a good one as far as maintenance is concerned

Trans Pennine Trail/Cheshire Lines path – Looking south from Cabin Lane Great Altcar – December 2020

Tissington Trail Derbyshire – March 2019

The difference in maintenance regimes is stark indeed yet (I thought*) both are National Trails and I’ve cycled them both.

I’ve commented on the terrible condition of the Cheshire Lines path, through West Lancashire, previously but it continues to deteriorate and seems to be fast becoming the forgotten Trail – so very sad. But before you shout ‘austerity’, which will of course clearly be a significant factor in recent years, this path has been suffering a lack of maintenance since it was fully opened some 30 years ago through West Lancashire. There was, in my view, hardly any maintenance to cut back on!

The part of the Trail/Path in Merseyside (Maghull) has seen some improvement work in recent years at the hands of the Merseyside North Volunteers. This is some of their excellent handiwork just north of the site of the former Sefton & Maghull Station and behind Sefton Drive, Maghull:-

* The Trans Pennine, it turns out, has not been made a National Trail (despite efforts to have it designated as such) and that probably indicates why its maintenance levels are not up to National Trail standards – With thanks to those correcting my view that it is a National Trail.

Maghull – Sympathetic Scything at the Meadow

Meadow Community Wildflower Garden behind Sefton Drive on the Cheshire Lines Path in Maghull.

merseysidenorth.blogspot.com/2018/06/sympathetic-scything.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+MerseysideNorthVolunteers+%28Merseyside+North+Volunteers%29

The link above is to a short time lapse video of scything being undertaken at the ‘Meadow’ behind Sefton Drive in Maghull on the Cheshire Lines Path. It’s worth watching to see how this old and environmentally friendly grass cutting method actually works. It’s being done by volunteers from the Merseyside North Volunteers Group.

Maghull – For all you volunteer litter pickers out there – Sunday 6th May

Meadow Community Wildflower Garden behind Sefton Drive on the Cheshire Lines Path in Maghull.

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At Meadow Community Wildflower Garden – Just behind Maghull’s Sefton Drive – See link above for details

Volunteer litter picking seems to have become a big hit in Maghull and Lydiate in recent times

Maghull – Volunteers requested to assist Sustrans on Cheshire Lines Path/Trans Pennine trail at Meadow Site behind Sefton Drive

Time for a sit down. Theses seats were put in in the past few weeks, by volunteers, on the Meadow Site behind Sefton Drive on the Cheshire Lines Path in Maghull.

Call for assistance from volunteer group:-

On Sunday the 14th May 2017 Staff and volunteers of Sustrans and the Trans Pennine Trail will be attending the Meadow site in Maghull.

There are various activities taking place through the day and you are invited to come along to the project site. We have been awarded funding to transform this area of land from a misused, overgrown stretch of path into an area that will be of benefit to the community, path users and also the wildlife of the area. Over the past year, we have cleared a large majority of the brambles and overgrowth, installed benches, begun to install bird and bug houses and scattered wildflower seeds. In preparation for the 14th May, we have ordered 500 wildflower plants ready to be planted on the site. This is your opportunity to come along, visit and discuss the project… take away some information… and if you can, lend a hand! Please also take this opportunity to walk or cycle along the this area of the Cheshire Lines (NCN 62/Trans Pennine Trail)… It’s a beautiful and amazing resource that we have in our area!

Feel free to pop along at any point through the day

Timing for the day:

10am onwards – Scything, raking and clearing the ground in preparation for planting will continue throughout the day. Bring a rake along and help us clear the ground of the spring overgrowth

1-3pm – Wildflower planting, publicity stand and kids activities.

Refreshments:

Sefton Meadows Garden Centre and Cafe are in close proximity to the site area.

Clothing:

If you are attending to participate in any of the raking, clearing and planting, please wear suitable clothing, sturdy footwear and gardening gloves.

Location:

Cheshire Lines/TPT – back of Sefton Drive, Maghull L31 8AQ

Any support that can be offered is always greatly appreciated, but if you do have any questions or require any further information… please do not hesitate to email me…

Thanks for your time and hope to see you soon

John Callaghan

E: jc@photoreal.co.uk
M: 07713158716
W: Merseyside North Volunteers merseysidenorth.uk

Maghull – Volunteer work on the ‘Meadow’ behind Sefton Drive

I have posted a few times recently about the work of the Merseyside North Volunteers who have been trying to tidy up/clean up the the start of the Cheshire Lines Path in Maghull behind Sefton Drive.

I went to have a look at their work a few days ago and here are a couple of photos which show how much bramble, rubbish and overgrowth has been cleared away and of course the seats that they have erected too. It’s looking good.

Looking north towards Lydiate Station site with Sefton Drive to the right. Much bramble clearance is evident.

Time for a sit down. Theses seats were only put in in the past few days but I made use of them talking to a fellow cyclist who was off to Southport along the Cheshire Lines Path.

The Merseyside North Volunteers work with the environmental charity Sustrans who created the Cheshire Lines Path.