Liverpool’s famous cycle makers – Liverpool on Wheels exhibition

Regular readers of this blog site will know that I’m a keen cyclist, so it’s probably no surprise that I found the cycling part of the new Liverpool on Wheels exhibition in the Museum of Liverpool very interesting. Here’s my photos of cycling items on display

The comment above could easily have been written today, particularly about Lancashire and Liverpool roads!

I recall when I was a teenager I bought a Harry Quinn racing cycle second hand but whilst it was a lovely bike (and incredibly light) I went off cycling for some reason and sold it on…..

This has been my 4th posting about the excellent Liverpool on Wheels exhibition curated by NML’s Land Transport Curator Sharon Brown.

Museum of Liverpool – New ‘Liverpool on Wheels’ exhibition is a hit

I went to have a look at this new exhibition yesterday and want to congratulate Sharon Brown (NML’s Land Transport Curator) and her staff on a great piece of work. Here’s some photos from my visit:-

I’m going to write up specific postings about the Ford Escort MK1, Liverpool cycle manufacturers, Meccano and Vulcan cars of Southport which were also a part of this excellent exhibition.

I’m told that in the recent children’s half term holiday the Museum of Liverpool was packed out and I’m sure many visitors were there to see Liverpool on Wheels. By the way there’s an great book you can buy with the same title, I’ve had a copy for donkeys years:-

It was originally published in 1998 and I noticed that copies of it were for sale in the Museum Shop.

If you get the opportunity why not go and have a look………. it’s on until 1st November

A history of Sefton Borough’s Communities

Whilst searching for the of the term origin of ‘Yort’ a while back (see my posting of 23 07 19 ‘Formby – What is a Yort?’) I happened upon this fascinating document by the Museum of Liverpool & English Heritage on the internet:-

Sefton Historic Settlement Study – Merseyside Historic Characterisation Project from 2011

www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/mol/archaeology/historic-characterisation-project/Sefton-Part-6.pdf

Here’s the introduction to the 84 page document:-

Introduction to Historic Settlement Study

The aim of the historic settlement study was to produce a consistent pro-forma template of information on settlements identified across all the historical townships in all 5 districts of Merseyside as based on the relevant paper First Edition Ordnance Survey 6” to 1 mile maps for Lancashire (published 1848 -1851) and Cheshire (1881 – 1882) . The purpose was to help provide background information for the data capture of character area polygons and also bring together some information on known or highlight other historic settlements, many of which have been lost or disguised by urban development. It was also thought that information would be useful for alerting to areas of possible archaeological interest to support the development management advice given by Merseyside Archaeological Advisory Service to the five districts. Historic urban settlement character is one of the key priority areas for research within Merseyside and one for which there is currently least documented archaeological evidence.

What a useful historic database this is for those wanting to know more about the origins of their own Sefton community. Go on find where you lived and get to know more about it………

Liverpool’s famous Green Goddesses

It’s hard to believe in 2019 that back in the 1930’s, 1940’s and 1950’s it was all the fashion to get rid of tramways and get rid of them virtually every UK town and city did – Liverpool in 1957.

The City had some really nice streamlined trams, the larger version of which gained the nickname ‘Green Goddess’ and if you are willing to travel to Derbyshire they have one at the National Tramway Museum at Crich – see link below. Sadly, each time I’ve been there it has not been one of the trams in use that day but you never know one day I’ll be lucky.

www.tramway.co.uk/trams/liverpool-869/

I would add that the smaller streamlined tram in Liverpool also had a nickname ‘Baby Grand’ and there’s a beautiful example of one at Wirral Transport Museum. It belongs to National Museums Liverpool. But I digress this posting is about the larger Green Goddesses.

The first two photo’s in the posting are from postcards.

The lead photo is of tram 293 built at Edge Lane Works in 1939. It is pictured at Hurst Gardens, Edge Lane Drive Liverpool in September 1957 in it’s special Last Tram livery. It is now I understand at Seashore Trolley Museum USA – Photo credit late Brian P Martin collection.

The 2nd photo is of tram 869 at the National tramway Museum Crich. It was restored in Liverpool by the ‘869 Group’ of the Merseyside Tramway Preservation Society. Photo credit unknown.

And finally a couple of shots I have taken myself – One at Crich of tram 869 in April this year and one of an OO gauge model of a Green Goddess on the model railway at Wirral Transport Museum:-

This photo is also amongst my Flickr shots at:- www.flickr.com/photos/86659476@N07/

Merseyside Maritime Museum – A woman navigating a STEM* career in the 18th century

History is a overwhelmingly male thing and women rarely get much of a mention so it’s interesting and informative when someone digs into our history to find out how a woman, working in Liverpool, was helping sailors to navigate at sea in the 18th Century.

The story is on Jen’s Blog on the National Museums Liverpool (NML) – Merseyside Maritime Museum web page which is linked below:-

blog.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/2018/08/a-woman-navigating-a-stem-career-in-the-18th-century/

I hope you’ll agree that Jen’s investigations into the life and works of Ann Smith helps to redress the balance and bring to the surface the enterprising and important works which Ann was a very big part of.

*STEM – Yes I had to scratch my head over that too. It stands for science, technology, engineering and mathematics as Jen explains in her blog posting.

Jen is my daughter I should add

Liverpool/Birkenhead – It’s railways in and around the Ports are all but ignored

A Mersey Docks & Harbour Board ‘Pug’ steam engine in OO scale.

Liverpool is famous the world over for many things and it celebrates the vast majority of them but one thing that seems to be all but ignored is the huge network of railways which once served the ports of Liverpool and indeed Birkenhead.

The other day, quite by chance, I came across this link (see below) to Bristol Museums:-

www.bristolmuseums.org.uk/m-shed/whats-on/train-rides/

Clearly in Bristol its port railways are being celebrated with a real railway run by the local museum.

Surely as the powers that be look for new attractions to celebrate the history of Liverpool and Birkenhead (and to
bring more visitors into the area) they can seriously look at following the Bristol model, can’t they?

Liverpool North Dock (LMS) 20th August 1926. A Simplex loco is on the left.

National Museums Liverpool already have a lovely 0-6-0 Mersey Docks and Habour Board dock steam loco in storage. It used to be on display but was sidelined when the new Museum of Liverpool was built. Having said that the thrust of this posting is not about just taking that old loco out of storage and displaying it (much as that would be a welcome bit of progress), it’s about trying to replicate something along the lines of what Bristol have managed to do on one or other side of the Mersey.

I have blogged on this subject previously – back in 2014 -, see link below:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2014/10/02/albert-dockmerseyside-maritime-museum-liverpool-whats-missing/

And here are a couple of links to You Tube videos about the Bristol Harbour railway:-

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5n1qeulrvXk

www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTpjqfS-58k

Here’s hoping a penny will drop somewhere one day.