Liverpool’s famous Green Goddesses

It’s hard to believe in 2019 that back in the 1930’s, 1940’s and 1950’s it was all the fashion to get rid of tramways and get rid of them virtually every UK town and city did – Liverpool in 1957.

The City had some really nice streamlined trams, the larger version of which gained the nickname ‘Green Goddess’ and if you are willing to travel to Derbyshire they have one at the National Tramway Museum at Crich – see link below. Sadly, each time I’ve been there it has not been one of the trams in use that day but you never know one day I’ll be lucky.

www.tramway.co.uk/trams/liverpool-869/

I would add that the smaller streamlined tram in Liverpool also had a nickname ‘Baby Grand’ and there’s a beautiful example of one at Wirral Transport Museum. It belongs to National Museums Liverpool. But I digress this posting is about the larger Green Goddesses.

The first two photo’s in the posting are from postcards.

The lead photo is of tram 293 built at Edge Lane Works in 1939. It is pictured at Hurst Gardens, Edge Lane Drive Liverpool in September 1957 in it’s special Last Tram livery. It is now I understand at Seashore Trolley Museum USA – Photo credit late Brian P Martin collection.

The 2nd photo is of tram 869 at the National tramway Museum Crich. It was restored in Liverpool by the ‘869 Group’ of the Merseyside Tramway Preservation Society. Photo credit unknown.

And finally a couple of shots I have taken myself – One at Crich of tram 869 in April this year and one of an OO gauge model of a Green Goddess on the model railway at Wirral Transport Museum:-

This photo is also amongst my Flickr shots at:- www.flickr.com/photos/86659476@N07/

Merseyside Maritime Museum – A woman navigating a STEM* career in the 18th century

History is a overwhelmingly male thing and women rarely get much of a mention so it’s interesting and informative when someone digs into our history to find out how a woman, working in Liverpool, was helping sailors to navigate at sea in the 18th Century.

The story is on Jen’s Blog on the National Museums Liverpool (NML) – Merseyside Maritime Museum web page which is linked below:-

blog.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/2018/08/a-woman-navigating-a-stem-career-in-the-18th-century/

I hope you’ll agree that Jen’s investigations into the life and works of Ann Smith helps to redress the balance and bring to the surface the enterprising and important works which Ann was a very big part of.

*STEM – Yes I had to scratch my head over that too. It stands for science, technology, engineering and mathematics as Jen explains in her blog posting.

Jen is my daughter I should add

Liverpool/Birkenhead – It’s railways in and around the Ports are all but ignored

A Mersey Docks & Harbour Board ‘Pug’ steam engine in OO scale.

Liverpool is famous the world over for many things and it celebrates the vast majority of them but one thing that seems to be all but ignored is the huge network of railways which once served the ports of Liverpool and indeed Birkenhead.

The other day, quite by chance, I came across this link (see below) to Bristol Museums:-

www.bristolmuseums.org.uk/m-shed/whats-on/train-rides/

Clearly in Bristol its port railways are being celebrated with a real railway run by the local museum.

Surely as the powers that be look for new attractions to celebrate the history of Liverpool and Birkenhead (and to
bring more visitors into the area) they can seriously look at following the Bristol model, can’t they?

Liverpool North Dock (LMS) 20th August 1926. A Simplex loco is on the left.

National Museums Liverpool already have a lovely 0-6-0 Mersey Docks and Habour Board dock steam loco in storage. It used to be on display but was sidelined when the new Museum of Liverpool was built. Having said that the thrust of this posting is not about just taking that old loco out of storage and displaying it (much as that would be a welcome bit of progress), it’s about trying to replicate something along the lines of what Bristol have managed to do on one or other side of the Mersey.

I have blogged on this subject previously – back in 2014 -, see link below:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2014/10/02/albert-dockmerseyside-maritime-museum-liverpool-whats-missing/

And here are a couple of links to You Tube videos about the Bristol Harbour railway:-

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5n1qeulrvXk

www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTpjqfS-58k

Here’s hoping a penny will drop somewhere one day.

Remembering WW1 – The bravery of Sgt. David Jones from Liverpool

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-merseyside-37266812

The BBC has the story on its web site – see link above

A memorial stone has been unveiled in honour of a Liverpool soldier who was awarded the Victoria Cross during World War One for “most conspicuous bravery”.

Sgt David Jones was awarded the medal for actions at Guillemont in the Battle of the Somme on 3 September 1916.

He had held his post for two days and nights with no food or water while his platoon came under heavy gun fire.

He chose to return to action rather than return to England to receive the VC and was killed on 7 October.

His widow was presented with his medal (which now resides at the Museum of Liverpool) at Buckingham Palace by King George V.

Gladstone, Bright & Lever – Three Liberals of their time

A recent visit to the Lady Lever Art Gallery turned into a bit of a Liberal history session. William Hesketh Lever, the creator of the gallery and model village of Port Sunlight, was a Liberal. What’s more he had marble busts made of his own favourite Liberals – Gladstone and John Bright. He had a bronze figurine created of Gladstone as well.

The Lady Lever Art Gallery was founded by William Hesketh Lever (1851-1925) and is dedicated to the memory of his wife Elizabeth. The gallery contains the best of his personal art collection.

I took photos of the Gladstone and Bright busts and the Gladstone figurine – they are below:-

Marble bust of Gladstone

Marble bust of Gladstone

IMG_8323

Marble bust of Bright

Marble bust of Bright

IMG_8325 r

Bronze Statuette of Gladstone

Bronze Statuette of Gladstone

IMG_8314

I used the phrase ‘Liberals of their Time’ to title this posting quite deliberately because in comparison to say the policies of the present incarnation of Liberal politics, the Liberal Democrats, what those prominent politicians of their day stood for may well look quite different. Then again the times were very different and the social justice issues, which they all tackled, were as important as big issues of today. But it is all about looking at such previous generations of Liberals (or indeed other non-Liberal politicians) in the context of the times in which they lived.

Liverpool – A visit to Sudley House

This little gem of a property is run by National Museums Liverpool (NML) and is quite near to Sefton Park. Sheila and I had not visited it before so had determined that we would do so.

Sudley House - South Elevation

Sudley House – South Elevation

The first thing to say is that it houses not 1 but 3 Turner paintings!

Hornby Tinplate O Gauge model railway items on display in the Childhood Room.

Hornby Tinplate O Gauge model railway items on display in the Childhood Room.

NML says this of it on its web site:-

www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/sudley/

We enjoyed our visit and will no doubt go back again at some point.

One issue that comes to mind though is that Sudley House is seemingly not well sign posted, at least it wasn’t from the direction we approached it. Some brown finger pointing signs would not go amiss.

Click on the photos to enlarge them

There are two further photos taken at the house (of light fittings) on my Flickr pages at:-

www.flickr.com/photos/86659476@N07/