Liverpool – Alfred Waterhouse, the city’s very own world famous architect

North Western Hotel – Liverpool

I stumbled across Waterhouse almost by chance having photographed a couple of the buildings he had a hand in – Rochdale Town Hall and Nottingham’s Prudential building – little did I realise that this prolific and famed architect was a son of Aigburth, Liverpool. Here’s what Wikipedia has to say about him:-

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_public_and_civic_buildings_by_Alfred_Waterhouse

And here are my shots of Rochdale Town Hall and Nottingham’s Prudential Building (warning the Nottingham shot includes the statue of a very unpopular man in Liverpool!) :-

Waterhouse designed the Tower after the original one was destroyed.

Prudential Building Nottingham designed by Waterhouse

The lead photo is, of course, Liverpool’s own North Western Hotel (now student accommodation) on Lime Street which Waterhouse designed – a quite magnificent building. And there are other buildings of his in Liverpool – The Royal Infirmary, Turner Memorial Home, Part of Newsham Park Hospital, The Prudential Assurance Building and The Victoria Building of Liverpool University.

Although he moved away from Liverpool at an early age I wonder why the City does not celebrate this most successful of architects who is probably best known as the designer in chief of the quite wonderful Natural History Museum in London. Indeed, I have only found one available book about his famous man and that’s with regard to his influences and work in the building the London Museum. Here’s a photo of the book:-

And one final thought. Is there a family connection between Alfred Waterhouse and the former Sykes Waterhouse Estate Agency based in Liverpool?

The lead photo is amongst my Flicker shots at:-

www.flickr.com/photos/86659476@N07/

Nottingham – A quality bus service

On a recent trip to Nottingham I had the opportunity to sample their bus service and rode the 58 from Daybrook into the City and back.

The modern double deckers of Nottingham City Transport (95% Nottingham City Council owned – 5% Transdev company) were well used and had both visual and audible notifications of each stop along the route. Here is the upper deck screen on the 58:-

Display on No.58  Nottingham bus r

What’s more every bus stop that I saw had an illuminated real time display showing when buses were due. I understand that 1,500 bus stops now have such a display.

Oh for such high standards on Arriva routes through Sefton Borough.

Another British City brings back trams – Edinburgh

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-27602618

The BBC has the story.

The 1940’s & 1950’s saw city after city and town after town get rid of the tram network just as American cities disposed of their streetcars. In a number of European cities the thinking was a little more forward looking and they kept their trams. Now trams and indeed streetcars are making a significant come back because of traffic congestion and environmental considerations.

What goes around comes around and with British Trams, especially those in seaside resorts like Blackpool and Southport, they used to do a circular tour for holiday makers.