Recycling on Merseyside – It’s presently a rubbish experience!

Having left it a while since Merseyside Waste Disposal Authority (MWDA) started to reopen its recycling centres I realised I had wood, metal and and a huge amount of garden waste to recycle. So what to do? Check which recycling centres are open, what’s the waiting times etc.

Well the internet was not a great deal of help other then telling me which ones were open. No live waiting times, no web cams of waiting vehicles, nothing to help me or you assess whether a journey to a recycling centre is worthwhile. Ho well, fill up the car and let’s see how we go. BIG mistake!

It’s about 6 miles from my Lydiate home to South Sefton Recycling Centre in Bootle but when I got there earlier today the queue was massive. Finding my way to the end of it I asked a young lady who was directing traffic how long it takes to get into the centre. At least 2 hours came the response! Well I can think of better things to do than sit in a queue with a car full of rubbish, so you won’t be surprised to hear that I headed home having given the junk a trip out.

But I return to the lack of live information on the internet. I wasted petrol, time and most importantly I added to our climate crises by using my car for a wasted/pointless/unnecessary journey. If I’d known how bad the queue was I’d not have set off in the first place!

And another thing, why would I or you be willing to spend 2 or more hours in a queue for a recycling centre? Maybe it’s me and my lack of willingness to queue for pretty much anything. I’ve never got the British queuing thing which so amuses folk from other countries.

‘If it’s worth queuing up for it’s not worth having’ as the old saying goes

Come on MWDA you can do better than the very limited amount of information you put on your website. I took my rubbish back home and will try another day in the future but as the photo at the head of this posting shows, the irresponsible will and do dump their rubbish in country lanes and ditches.

Waste Recycling – UK is 10th across Europe

I picked this useful information up from a Waste Care newsletter and thought it worth sharing.

The United Kingdom and Italy tied for tenth place among the top-ranked municipal waste recyclers in Europe during 2015, figures published at the end of January by the European Union’s statistics body Eurostat suggest.

According to the figures, which are submitted on behalf of the EU’s 27 member states, as well as other European nations including Norway, Switzerland and Montenegro, the UK’s combined recycling and composting rate stood at 43.5% in 2015, down from 43.7% a year earlier.

Germany hung onto its spot at the top of the league table, with an overall recycling rate of 66.1% for 2015, a slight improvement on its previous performance, comfortably clear of the second top performing nation Austria, whose recycling rate stood at 56% for the year.

On average, EU member states recycled 45.2% of their municipal waste, the data suggests. Data outlining the amount of waste land filled per country has yet to be published.

Compared to its 2014 ranking, the UK dropped one place, largely due to an apparent surge in recycling in Slovenia – which leapt from a 36% recycling rate in 2014 to 54.1% in 2015.

Elsewhere the data also offers a breakdown of waste generated and treated per person, suggesting that across the continent in 2015 around 477kg of municipal waste was generated per person, an increase from the 474kg recorded in 2014 – the first such rise since 2007. Despite this increase, waste generation per person is down by 9% compared with its peak of 527kg per person in 2002.

With thanks to Waste Care for the lead to this posting.

Recycling – We need to present it well to stop it going to landfill.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-37159581

The BBC has the story on it web site – see link above

I have often thought that whilst we are quite rightly encouraged to recycle understanding what can be recycled, where and how is often not clear enough.

Of course there are idle beggars who are too lazy to recycle or too could not be bothered to rinse out some recyclable items.

Recycling and reuse is the future and we all have to understand that, yes even the idle beggars.

But what happens when folk are pulled up for not recycling properly? The right wing press jumps to their defence! An environmental issue to despair about.

Pollution and Recycling plans to be ditched by EU – Utter maddness!

Air quality and recycling goals at risk

Lib Dem Cllr. Simon Shaw (Birkdale Ward - Sefton Council) promoting recycling

Lib Dem Cllr. Simon Shaw (Birkdale Ward – Sefton Council) promoting recycling

The Guardian claims to have seen leaked documents that show EU plans to tackle air pollution and make countries recycle more of their rubbish are to be scrapped. The paper says that the initiatives at risk are a clean air directive designed to reduce the health impacts from air pollution caused by vehicles, industry and power plants, and a waste directive that would set states the target of recycling 70% of waste by 2030.

The Guardian carried this story recently

Recycling – An interesting take on local authority spending priorities

Thank tank calls for waste revolution

The Circular Economy Task Force has warned that UK councils are spending more on collecting rubbish than on housing or planning. The bodies accumulatively spend £3.9bn on waste, £3bn on housing and £2.3bn on planning, and have been encouraged by the Task Force to reform waste disposal strategies to optimise operations and save money. The report suggests billions could be saved investing in waste and recycling plants, some of which could generate energy from rubbish. Capturing reusable or recyclable products that are currently lost could be worth £1.7bn a year.

This report seems to be saying that there is money and energy to be made if changes are made. I wonder if it is really that simple?

With thanks to the LGiU for the lead to this story.

Recycling of waste – Sefton and elsewhere – And what about yogurt pots!

Recycling rates to slump?

index

Rates of recycling rose by just 0.2% in 2012/13 and are predicted to fall by 2% in the year 2013-14, according to waste firm SITA. The firms blames the use of multiple bins for the collection of recycling. “Rates of overall recycling, especially in high density urban areas, are undoubtedly higher when councils and their contractors run a mixed collection service”, said SITA chief executive, David Palmer-Jones. A Defra spokesman said it was working to ensure it meets the EU’s 50% target of recycling half of all household waste by 2020.

Lib Dem Cllr. Simon Shaw promoting recycling

Lib Dem Cllr. Simon Shaw promoting recycling

This is an interesting slant on the recycling issue. In Sefton the Council uses separate bins. I wonder if there is credible evidence to back up what SITA says?

Another related issue in Council areas, like Sefton, is the frustration of residents who want to recycle things like plastic yogurt and butter pots. The items have logos on them saying they can be recycled but many Councils don’t collect them. I think this is a case of people with environmental/green attitudes being ahead of the ability of Councils to deliver the recycling service they demand.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-27680027

With thanks to the LGiU for the SITA aspect of this posting.