Perch Rock – A Seashaken House

New Brighton & Perch Rock Lighthouse

For some reason, I’ve long had a fascination with lighthouses and have read a number of books about them and how/why they were constructed. Most recently I’ve been reading a book by Tom Nancollas called Sea Shakenhouses – A Lighthouse History from Eddystone to Fastnet (published in 2018) – and a great read it has been too.

Perch Rock Lighthouse

The fourth’ rock lighthouse’ Tom covers in his book is my local one, Perch Rock in New Brighton. ‘Built between 1827 & 1830, it is the fourth-oldest rock lighthouse to survive’. However, the others ‘have lost most of their original fittings, making Perch Rock the only lighthouse tower to retain its simple, late-Georgian interior. This rarity value is enhanced by its intactness. Unlike other lighthouses, the Perch Rock was hardly updated during its working life. Its conversion to automatic operation in the 1920s as low-key Many towers suffered from their conversion to electrical or diesel power and subsequent automation and de-manning, their nineteenth-century interiors mostly gone as a result. The fact that it was decommissioned and sealed before it could be tampered with makes this tower fascinating.’

I could go on as the story of this rock lighthouse and its relationship with New Brighton is both interesting and scandalous in equal measure. I encourage readers who want to know more to get hold of a copy of this excellent book.

Please click on the photos, which are my own, to enlarge them.

50 years of the 2nd (Wallasey) Mersey Tunnel

This is the front page of the booklet produced to celebrate the opening of Kingsway Tunnel in 1971.

I’ve posted a couple of times in the past about the Mersey Tunnels and as the second, Kingway Tunnel, is this week celebrating its 50 anniversary it seemed appropriate to re-run (see links below) those postings:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2017/10/06/building-the-mersey-tunnels/

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2016/05/08/mersey-tunnel-kingsway-75-miles-of-new-electric-cables/

These are the tickets my family were given when we walked through the new (2nd) Tunnel in 1971, the day before it opened to vehicles.

Sadly, I don’t have any photos of us walking through the tunnel on what I can still recall as a very exciting day indeed. Even now when I drive through either tunnel, probably 3 or 4 times a year, I think back to that walk-through with my Mum and Dad. Yes, the Mersey tunnels are both very significant pieces of engineering to marvel at.

Liverpool & The Mersey – Cruising the Cut

Liverpool Waterfront Panorama

My good friend Andrew Blackburn has a bit of a thing about vlogs entitled ‘Cruising the Cut’ of which there are a great many. He showed me a few some time ago and you know there’s something mesmerising about them and I’ve now watched quite a few myself, although I’m told that therapy may help:-)

The reason I’m blogging about this is that in October 2019 the vloger, former TV presenter David Johns*, came to Liverpool to experience crossing the Mersey estuary in a narrow boat. And here’s his vlog of the experience which sits with his many other vlogs on You Tube:-

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5v9wASAnIvY

Museum of Liverpool and Link from the docks to the Leeds Liverpool Canal.

I hope you enjoy this vlogger’s take on Liverpool & the Mersey and you never know you may even get hooked on Cruising the Cut!

* He used to work as a local TV news reporter for ITV in the south east of England. After 13 years of doing this and working in radio, he decided to chuck it all in and buy a narrowboat to cruise around the canals on.

David even does his own merchandise and yes I bought one of these mugs for Andrew.

Click on the photos to enlarge them

Port of Liverpool and Brexit – Some interesting questions & big challenges

Stena Precision at Birkenhead *

The BBC has the article on its website – see link below:-

www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-51329176

The Mersey – Looking from Bootle over the River to the Wirral

Of course, if the Port of Liverpool succeeds in gaining more trade the consequences swing back to that very knotty problem of land transport access to the Port, the over-capacity of the A5036 (Port to Switch Island road link), the lack of capacity of the rail link to the port (plus poor/limited regional rail capacity) and the new road proposed to be built through Rimrose Valley Country Park.

Rimrose Valley Country Park in the foreground and the Port cranes in the background.

Seaforth/Liverpool 2 – The container ship that could have sunk

The Liverpool Echo and BBC both have articles on their websites – see link below:-

www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/crew-forced-abandon-container-ship-16324675

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-48399926

A quite remarkable listing of this huge container ship. I’ve not photographed this particular MSC vessel previously on the Mersey but here’s a sister ship of the same line:-

Click on the photo to enlarge it