Liverpool – Allerton Oak wins tree of the year

The BBC has the article on its website – see link below:-

www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/uk-england-merseyside-50141031

My attention was brought to this by my researcher Roy Connell who knows that by nature I’m a tree-hugger. The photo’s on the BBC website remind me very much of my own tree of every year the Major Oak in Sherwood Forest:-

Well I am from Nottighamshire originally, but seriously great news that Allerton Oak in the Woodlands Trust Tree of 2019.

Maghull – Parking for its new North Station – Some observations

Maghull North Station car park

Firstly, like virtually every railway opening/reopening project across the UK the number of people using a new rail facility is always greater than anticipated. In the case of the newish Maghull North Station project the greater than planned for issue is without doubt the size of its car park, which on working weekdays is full by around 8am.

Some of us with long memories and residents who live around the other Maghull Station will say something along the lines ‘we knew this would happen’. The history of Maghull Station’s now pretty large car park is that each time it has been expanded it has always filled up and the consequence has been commuter’s cars being parked on surrounding residential streets. Sefton Council addressed the latter issue by putting a 1hr morning parking restriction on the nearby streets who’s residents voted to have such a restriction. The effect has been to deter all day commuter parking.

So on to Maghull North Station where history is clearly repeating itself it seems. I hear that some residents of the Poppy Fields Estate and the more established nearby residential roads on the other side of the railway line are up for trying to stop commuter parking in their roads. At face value a solution similar to the one used at Maghull Station should be possible in the established roads and that could be surely be undertaken (with prior consultation of course with residents) by Sefton Highways at any time. The Poppy Fields estate presents a different problem though as I’m guessing that none of the roads there are yet adopted by Sefton Council. If this is the case the Council can’t do anything until after the contractor/builder hands over the roads, pavements etc., in a suitable condition, to the Council.

This matter came to mind again now (I’ve mentioned it in previous blog postings about the new station) because I’ve experienced difficulty in parking at Maghull North Station myself at times and it’s also on a regular cycling route of mine so I can see how full the car park is each day. On top of this I’ve read social media posts where folks are expressing frustration with the situation. Finally, the issue came up in a conversation with an old friend of mine, former local Sefton Councillor Cliff Mainey who is now well retired from local politics. I mention Cliff because together with fellow former Sefton Councillor for Sudell Ward, Roy Connell, they worked up (with Sefton’s traffic engineers and residents) the scheme brought in around Maghull Station around 10 years ago.

I suppose the next step for concerned local residents is for them to lobby Sefton Council to take action.

And to close this posting a bit of history which I don’t think needs repeating but I will anyway. One of the major problems is that the two stations north of Maghull North Station have either very little in terms of car parking facilities (Town Green) or nothing (Aughton Park) and this obviously causes folks to drive down to Maghull to try to get a parking space at either of its stations.

Southport – Its Victorian legacy has not been fully understood by modern custodians

Place North West has an interesting and thought provoking article on its website – see link below:-

www.placenorthwest.co.uk/news/my-place-southport/

In my view Southport suffers from two distinct and unique disadvantages. Firstly, of being at one far end of a Metropolitan Borough (Sefton) whilst being mostly surrounded by a County (Lancashire) it no longer (since 1974) has any significant political connections with. Secondly, of having some very poor road and rail connections to the east and north of it.

If you start from the premise that the modern custodians have failed then I feel the disadvantages which have been put in their way are very much the cause. What’s more they’ve not been self-created disadvantages but very much imposed ones from Beeching’s railway cut backs of the 1960’s, the lack of an Ormskirk road by-pass, and the reorganisation of local government in 1974. The fact that none of theses significant downsides for Sunny Southport have been successfully addressed is the ongoing challenge which the present day custodians can’t crack – although that’s not for the want of trying.

I’ve commented on this so tough to crack conundrum previously:-

tonyrobertson.mycouncillor.org.uk/2019/01/06/southport-betting-on-a-bright-future-for-our-local-seaside-town/

My view is that Southport has been failed but the causes of that failure are very much external to the Town.

With thanks to Roy Connell for the lead to this posting

Formby – What is a Yort?

I’ve cycled past this street nameplate many times and like others in our cycling group I have scratched my head wondering what a Yort is?

Googling ‘Yort’ did not throw up any answers so my fellow cycler Roy Connell emailed the Clerk of Formby Parish Council who told him the term may mean ‘Yard’ but also suggested that we ask the views of Formby Civic Society. An e-mail to the Civic Society brought back this:-

‘I have been doing some digging in our archive and attach a newspaper cutting from about 1957 which gives some interesting background information. We hold a copy of all 10 sheets of the 1845 Tithe map and the Schedule shows Formby had 83 plots incorporating the name “Yort”.

Today I know of a house at 94 Gores Lane called Long Yort www.flickr.com/photos/formbycivicsociety/5885064473/in/album-72157625287478503/

Below is an article from “An Agricultural Study of Formby with Ainsdale” By Kim Morton (1981) Edited by J. Lewis, M. Adams & C. Ahmad which actually is related to Andrews Yort.’

Orchards

Hume (1866, 77) claimed that the first orchard in all of Lancashire was in Ravenmeols; the site was shown to him by the inhabitants of Park House in Ravenmeols, located to the south of Kirklake, in the same neighbourhood[1]. The piece of ground was called Andrew’s Gardens, or Bowers Gardens so named because two hundred years previously (about 1665) it had been occupied by Andrew Brown. His orchard had been famous for its apples (Kelly, 1973, 22). However, the orchards were destroyed by the sand moving inland and now nothing remains but the ‘mounds of sand and tufts of starrgrass’ (Hume 1866, 77). Local folklore states that Andrews Lane and Andrews Yort of the present day represent Andrew Brown’s holdings in Ravenmeols. Holt (1795, 83) comments that ‘…there are no orchards worthy of notice in this part of the country’ at the end of the 18th century (1795, 83).

So now you know what a ‘Yort’ is assuming if, like me, you were in the dark about it before.

My thanks to Formby Civic Society for their invaluable help with this posting

Click on the photos to enlarge them

‘UK led towards no-deal Brexit by untruthful elite’

The Guardian has the article on its website – see link below:-

www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/jun/18/uk-led-towards-no-deal-brexit-by-untruthful-elite-says-ex-eu-envoy-ivan-rogers

And what makes this mind boggling situation, which the UK has put itself in, even more bizarre is that Brexit has the backing of the majority of the leadership of the Labour Party.

A no deal Brexit would be ‘economic lunacy’ certainly but any form of Brexit will be worse than the deal the UK has with the EU now!

My thanks to Roy Connell for the lead to this posting

Sefton Council – Going Green in the battle to control plastic pollution

Part of Sefton’s coastline at Crosby

The Liverpool Echo has the article on its website – see link below

www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/plans-put-forward-help-save-16371115

Now for all of you out there who think I have a downer on the Labour Party here’s a positive story I’m happy to promote.

Firstly, I should say that one of my big issues with Labour on Merseyside has always been their lack of environmental/green credentials. You only have to look at the troubles in both Knowsley and Liverpool Councils where building on parks and green spaces has actually been promoted by Labour. Their approach to Sefton’s Local Plan adoption process, where they seemed to look upon environmental campaigners as nothing but a bloody nuisance, also comes to mind as an example of my concerns.

But credit where it’s due this plastic pollution position adopted by Labour-run Sefton Council is a step in the right direction. Oh and by the way the minutes of the meeting where the motion was agreed say that all present (of differing political parties) supported it.

With thanks to Roy Connell for the lead to this posting.