WW1 – A Sefton Parish family with huge losses

As the centenary year of the end of WW1 is about to close I decided to have a close look at the war memorial that stands on the opposite side of the road to St. Helens Church in Sefton Village:-

And here’s a shot of the plaque denoting those who fell during the Great War from Sefton Parish – Note the loss of 3 people in the Wood family:-

And then in a chance spotting within the extensive graveyard of the church I came across this grave:-

One family (the Wood’s) with 3 sons lost in consecutive years 1914, 1915 & 1916, with two other families (the Almond’s and the Wharton’s) losing 2 members – such an appalling loss of life.

We will remember them

Click on the photos to enlarge them

Maghull North Station – Tribute to the fallen and the suffering

I went along to the still new Maghull North Station (on Merseyrail’s Northern Line to Ormskirk) today to have a look at the just installed piece of artwork which celebrates the work of the former Moss Side Hospital and its pioneering treatment of shell shock. Of course, the hospital is long gone and the new Poppy Fields Housing Estate now occupies the site.

Here are some shots of what I think is a quite striking piece of artwork which is sited adjacent to the station ticket office:-

It was unveiled by local historian and former Maghull GP Dr John Rowland who has published a number of books on the history of Maghull and Lydiate.

A fine tribute to Moss Side, its staff, doctors and indeed patients who benefited from its pioneering treatments during and after World War 1.

The 3rd photo is amongst my Flickr shots at:-

www.flickr.com/photos/86659476@N07/

Mersey Ferries at War – 1st World War

Modern Mersey Ferry Royal Iris but why its called Royal is in this blog posting

www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/nostalgia/how-mersey-ferries-went-war-14561873

The Liverpool Echo has the story on its web site – see link above

It’s 100 years since the Mersey Ferries Iris and daffodil were involved in the Zeebrugge raid and the short Echo article is well worth reading.

Remembering WW1 – The bravery of Sgt. David Jones from Liverpool

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-merseyside-37266812

The BBC has the story on its web site – see link above

A memorial stone has been unveiled in honour of a Liverpool soldier who was awarded the Victoria Cross during World War One for “most conspicuous bravery”.

Sgt David Jones was awarded the medal for actions at Guillemont in the Battle of the Somme on 3 September 1916.

He had held his post for two days and nights with no food or water while his platoon came under heavy gun fire.

He chose to return to action rather than return to England to receive the VC and was killed on 7 October.

His widow was presented with his medal (which now resides at the Museum of Liverpool) at Buckingham Palace by King George V.

Liverpool – The Poppies have arrived at St George’s Hall

Tower of London Poppy r

Above is a poppy from the Tower of London display

www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/whats-on/arts-culture-news/poppies-liverpool-st-georges-hall-10397692

The Liverpool Echo has the story – see link above

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-merseyside-34747072

The BBC also has a time lapse video of the installation on its web site – see link above

The artwork installation looks great; must get to see it.

War Memorials – Returning to my theme for 2014

1st World War Memorial in Potters Lane, Higher Walton, Lancashire

1st World War Memorial in Potters Lane, Higher Walton, Lancashire

I am still looking out for war memorials and more will follow. Here is one spotted by my old friend Roy Connell whilst he was out bike riding in deepest rural Lancashire recently.

It’s a simple but powerful memorial to this small community’s WW1 lost generation.