When the Right is controlling British politics – That’s most of the time!

It really is the majority of the time whether we on the left are willing to admit it or not.

There have only been 4 General Elections since the 2nd World war when the the left has had a significant majority in the House of Commons. Then again it could well be argued that whilst Tony Blair had a huge majority his was hardly a government of the left and probably it was only just left of centre. Could the same or similar be said of Harold Wilson’s Government?

What started this line of thought was that I happened upon a lecture by Vernon Bogdanor being shown on the BBC Parliament Channel recently. It was actually about the history of the Conservative Party. Now whilst I don’t care to be told about the regular electoral success of the Tories Bogdanor is always interesting, impartial and factual in his work.

One thing he mentioned has long been a matter of great interest to me and that is the working class Conservatives who have regularly helped put a Tory government in power. You could be forgiven for thinking that the working class (not a term a personally subscribe to but one that is widely quoted) will usually be voters of the left and therefore for Labour, but up to a third of them are not. What’s more many of them may be conservative (with a small c) or simply right wing whilst at the same time tribally aligned with the Labour Party.

I have regularly been fascinated by the group of Labour MP’s (and there have always been a fair number of them in each Parliament) who come over as reactionary, right wing, anti progressive politics or just Tories wearing a Labour rosette. I saw similar people in the trade union movement in my time as well. They must come from families that are loyal to Labour yet their stance on things such as equality issues, gay rights, crime and punishment, immigration etc. are firmly based on the politics of the right. Often these MP’s and trade unionists will be from the industrial midlands and the north and they will be utterly loyal to Labour, no matter what it stands for.

That loyalty will stem from the early days of the trade union movement and the need for trade unionists to stick together through thick and thin. It will have been inbred into them through families, trade unions and the Labour Party, yet often these people will be as far away from progressive politics as you can find. Sticking together is the most important thing, backing their leaders almost come what may is also big for them and I think it is what is in part driving the cult of Corbyn.

He’s either a very, very late political developer or he really is a second division politician of the left who has, almost by chance, found himself leading a political party. If you look at his history prior to being elected as Labour Leader he had pretty much no positions of responsibility in public life much at all. The Labour left will say that was because he had always been down-trodden by the right wing of the Labour Party (the Social Democrats) and held back and that he was always going to be a working class hero of the left one day. Well it’s a view but hardly a credible one I would venture to say.

Corbyn’s big problem is that he has some right wing tendencies and Brexit is the one that really stands out. Brexit has always been about internal battles within the Tory Party. UKIP was set up as those within the Tory Party who could not get the Tories to back leaving the EU felt they had to take a different route. Of course they succeeded in turning the Tories into a Brexit Party and they won over many people within Labour too. Remember the successes of UKIP electorally have often been in areas of England that are working class and where they won council seats they were often in Labour areas. Now UKIP has all but expired its supporters have drifted back to the Tory Party or indeed Labour. That Corbyn backs Brexit is bizarre to many of us on the left of British politics but he does and the Labour Party is backing him despite, we are told, the vast majority of Labour voters not backing Brexit.

But Corbyn is loyal to his right wing working class supporters who of course were the part of the Labour vote that helped the Tories/UKIP give us our Brexit. His party prides itself, or at least it used to do, on being a very broad church. At one end true socialists looking to break up the capitalist system and at the other people who would be at home in a Bluekip type Party if only it was called the Labour Party. That is indeed a very broad church, you could say so broad that internal power struggles would be almost impossible to to stop. The Social Democrats within Labour have gone very quiet these days (with a few exceptions) especially those in elected public positions as their stance is particularly unwelcome in Corbyn’s Labour Party and they need to be seen to be complying with the wishes of Momentum if they are not to be deselected.

So at face value Labour is presently seen to be a party of the hard left under McDonnell and Corbyn but, with Brexit in particular, they are peddling a Bluekip line. Also the party is having more than its share of infighting over racial issues at present and this is another indication of people of the left holding what seem to be intolerant right wing views.

Across Europe in many counties Social Democrat and Socially Liberal Parties have been a part of the mainstream. Labour has tried to be that in the UK but the drag of having illiberal and far left members in the same party has meant that it has struggled far more more than it has succeeded. Many thought that the victory of Tony Blair signaled a new (or New) Labour Party with broad center ground and moderate appeal but the medicine did not work and now Labour is in the hands of both the socially illiberal and hard left at the same time!

The point of all this? To show that the right has a huge influence on UK politics and that’s not just in the UKIP and Tory parties. Labour has it’s right wingers too and it can be quite easily argued that even the Lib Dems all but ceased to have a Socially Liberal leadership during Nick Clegg’s unfortunate time as Leader. Thankfully and even slightly surprisingly, under Cable, it seems to be regaining its radical and socially liberal edge though.

Which ever way you look at it the right usually predominates in UK politics and its because, in my view, there’s no electorally successful Social Democrat/Liberal Party at the heart of our mainstream politics and I say that as someone who looks upon some Social Democrats as being too right wing.

Farron, religion and Liberalism

That a thoroughly decent man has been forced from public office is a given and I say that as an atheist.

Yes I was very uncomfortable watching Tim contort himself into knots when asked about his religious views and yes the media were out to do him harm over his religion. Just think about it, how many other leading politicians have strong religious views and how many of them have been hounded out of office for holding them? Blair got some stick because he was Roman Catholic but I struggle to think of many others in recent times.

Did Tim bring trouble upon himself? Well yes to some extent because of this contorted answers that had us all scratching our heads. And you know despite his odd answers he actually did a lot to back minority rights and the LGBT community have acknowledged that apart from what I will call their more militant fringe.

Can you be a Liberal hold religious views? Well you must be able to as there seem to be many people out there who do. Anyway one of the significant strands of liberalism comes from ‘Chapel Liberals’ and Methodism. I am sure my dear old Mum was a Chapel Liberal and I personally know many Lib Dem’s who hold strong religious views and I count them as my friends.

The crunch issue as I see it is this. As a Liberal your guiding light is the rights of others and your being willing to stand up for those rights even when you personally do not subscribe to them. That’s what Tim Farron tried to do, that’s why he stood up for LGBT rights even though his religion was seemingly telling him otherwise. His problem was being unable to publicly reconcile his liberalism and religion when the contradictions were put to him by the media. And once he had shown weakness the first time he was asked about the matter it was always going to be where the media homed in.

Were the media involved in bullying and intimidation? Yes of course they were, indeed they were acting as though they were from the 1950’s and steeped in intolerance with more than a hint of the Spanish Inquisition thrown in for good (or is that bad) measure. It’s as though Farron were being treated as a criminal for holding religious and political views, it’s a sad reflection on our reactionary media and the intolerant times we live in.

Yes of course opposition politicians also exploited Tim’s inability to answer straight forward questions on the potential conflict between his religion and his liberalism. I picked up what I viewed to be political trolling comments on this very matter.

Brexit has split us very deeply because it has brought back into focus views that people used to be ashamed of talking about – racism, intolerance, homophobia, etc. Farron in my view became a victim of that new intolerant culture and it shames our society greatly.

One last thing, the schism on the left of British politics is not actually so much about policy but about libertarian versus authoritarian approaches. In general terms socialism is more authoritarian and liberalism is obviously libertarian. Tell you what is good for you as opposed to giving you the facts to make your own mind up you could say. Quite obviously our society is by its nature these days far more authoritarian and less libertarian. I hope it goes without saying that Conservatism is also authoritarian.

Authoritarian societies don’t tolerate differences from the norm and the norm is usually set by the ruling classes. Farron is, like many Liberals before him and those who will follow him, too libertarian to be tolerated by a media and a political establishment that see most things very black and white, right and wrong.

Don’t look upon Farron as someone you liked or disliked in party political terms, look upon him as someone our society showed the door to because he was not conforming to the norms as interpreted by the media and the establishmnet. Then look at other minorities and think about them too, who will be next?

Oh yes and Farron stood in 2017 General Election on a policy of tolerance!

Brexit – Now about controlling our borders!


www.independent.co.uk/voices/brexit-theresa-may-immigration-borders-closed-open-europe-eu-migrants-fantasy-a7667586.html

The Independent has the story on its web site – see link above

A well thought our piece in my view and I particularly liked this:-

‘The problem with basing your case on scaremongering, spin and out-and-out nonsense is that eventually it will come back to bite you. Just say the word “Iraq” to Tony Blair.’

My thanks to Roy Connell for spotting this article.

Brexit – Like Tony Blair John Major is right

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-39109408

The BBC has the story on its web site – see link above

I find myself now agreeing with a Tory politician following agreeing with a former Labour one on the same issue – Brexit.

This time John Major is in effect attacking the nutters in his party, UKIP and indeed Labour who seem to think all will be rosy in the Brexit garden. He is right to say that the impression being given by Brexiters, that all will be great, is utter rubbish and that everything is likely to be very far from wonderful.

But as I took in the thoughtful comments of John Major I was also watching the BBC evening regional news programme who, for reasons best know to themselves, had taken a caravan to Blackpool to hear the views of their Brexit lovers. And what did we hear but that ridiculous and utterly untrue story about bananas! Give me strength and give the BBC some idea about how to conduct a meaningful regional news item!

Is Labour just an alternative Tory Party for those who consider themselves to be ‘working class’?

Does it go without saying that the vast majority of Labour voters would never vote Tory and that they will continue to vote Labour pretty much whatever the party stands for?

I ask as having been involved in politics for some 37 years now I really don’t know what Labour stands for these days other than not being the Tory Party. Just look at this:-

They started to privatise the NHS when in government but now say they oppose NHS privatisation.

They campaigned, if rather weakly, to Remain in the EU during the recent referendum but now support Leaving the EU.

They backed and promoted the war in Iraq, along with the Tories, but now seem thoroughly embarrassed (and rightly so) by what they did.

They were pretty much a social democrat party during the Blair years but now have a socialist leader and a predominately socialist membership.

Their MP’s are mainly social democrat in outlook and belief but their party membership has no time for them, often labeling them as Red Tories.

Their ‘working class’ supporters are seemingly rather right wing and are tempted to support UKIP at times when tribal loyalty starts to wear a little thin.

Is ‘not being the Tory Party’ now Labour’s strap line and main selling point?

And I never cease to be amazed by the number of champagne socialists there seem to be around Labour. Top of the range cars are often a give away but then you discover that the drivers/owners are Corbyn backers. How does that add up because for all his faults Corbyn is an unlikely champagne socialist. Indeed, having personally felt he deserved the benefit of the doubt and that the press were out to hound him, I think it may well be fair to say that he’s a socialist from a previous era. A throw back to Michael Foot’s idea of what Labour should be all about? Certainly he does not come across as someone at ease with our diverse society, more as though modern ways leave him with a hankering for the good old socialist days.

I often use the somewhat jokey phrase these days ‘Hey I’m a Liberal, most Labour Party folk seem too right wing too me’ yet, whilst this line often brings about a wry smile when I use it, I really do think it fits many Labour politicians.

Being known as a ‘not the Tory Party party’ is one thing but supporting Teresa May’s off to the far right Government, as Labour has done over Brexit, just puts them on a charge of being Red Tories in reality rather than just by insult from their own left wing.

Brexit and Tony Blair – He’s right!

Well I never thought I would say that about Tony Blair who to many of us is in the same naughty corner as Nick Clegg for lack of credibility. BUT both of them are right about Brexit whatever I may feel about Blair’s Iraq War and Clegg’s Tuition Fees U-turn – and I feel a great deal about those issues.

Brexit is utter madness and it will more than likely destroy our economy, standards of living and many other things. That’s fine to Brexiters but it is not fine by me. They can opt for poverty, low living standards etc. if they want but those of us who don’t want to step off that cliff edge with them need to keep up the fight against Brexit.

In many ways Blair is saying what many Remainers have been saying for a long time now, indeed he seems to hold very similar views to Tim Farron the Lib Dem Leader who has been at the forefront of the campaign to oppose Brexit.

Blair was always too right wing for my taste (although that goes for most Labour politicians) but those of us who want to save the UK from the mad Hard Brexit plan of UKIP/Tory/Labour have to put our distrust of each other to one side. The battle to save the UK from the catastrophic consequences of Brexit is far more important than the chips we may carry around on our shoulders from previous fights.

And no I have not gone over to the dark side and yes Blair is still in my view a person who should be facing the consequences of his ill-considered war in Iraq.

But yes we are into the fight of our lives and if we don’t wake up it will give us a beating that many of those who voted for Brexit never even thought of whilst they were being lied to by an utterly irresponsible press and that cabal of appalling MP’s who led the Leave campaign.

So hey Tony Blair is right, get over it; we should be chucking verbal bricks at at the UKIP/Tory/Labour politicians who have gotten us into this mess not him. We can deal with him when this crisis is over.