‘Melling through the Ages’ book review

I was delighted to see that Melling resident Carol Fitzgerald has written a comprehensive book on the history of Melling so purchased a copy direct from her. I was not to be disappointed, this book is an excellent read.

My connections with Melling are that I have lived in neighbouring Maghull and now Lydiate for 52 years, I represented Melling Civil Parish as a Sefton Borough Councillor from 1999 to 2011, my Dad was once given a cabbage (I kid you not) for playing the organ at the church of St. Thomas’ on Melling Rock by local farmer Mrs Roby and I regularly cycle the country lanes through the rural parts of it.

My first thoughts on starting to read the book were – it does not have an ISBN number or a date of publication. I’d not seen that before with such a significant publication but then it dawned on me that it’s a self-publication*. I think it was published in 2020 but stand to be corrected.

What I like about reading through a local history book is that you get to know the meaning of words you know well but have never actually known the meaning of. A case in point is ‘Cunscough’ as in Cunscough Lane, Melling. I now know it comes from Old Norse and means ‘Kings Wood’. And what about the ‘Woodend’ area of Maghull? Well it seems that it was quite literally the end of a forest that stretched from Waddicar to Wood End Maghull as detailed in the Doomsday Book.

Considering the modern-day flooding issues which the East Parishes area of Sefton Borough suffers from the historic references to the draining of the waters of Hengarther Lake and the ditches dug to drain the area into what was then the tidal River Alt (at the direction of the monks of Cockersands) some 800 years ago are interesting. Clearly, the rich arable farmland for which our parts of both Sefton and West Lancashire are famous hark back to such works but it also shows how such interventions (and the more modern works) have not really solved the flooding which was once a natural occurrence.

Melling Rock is the highest natural point in Sefton Borough and that fits uncomfortably well with the previous references to flooding.

There’s an interesting reference to the Tatlock Charity dating back many years to a John Tatlock born in 1653 and which still pays out today. Then there’s the Formby charitable work associated with the Industrial Revolution and the destitution it caused in Melling leading to Poor Relief administered by the Church. The Rev. Miles Formby being the Vicar 1829-1849.

Melling Tithebarn known these days for being a social, artistic and meeting venue was originally built to house the ‘tithe’ which was due to the Rector of Halsall who also collected such tithes from Lydiate, Halsall, Downholland etc.

There’s quite a bit about the development of farming across Melling and a connected modern day project to find evidence for occupation of a possible medieval moated site on the land around Wood Hall Farm which dates from around 1642. I recall having the opportunity to visit that farm, run by Christine and Henry Glover, during my time as a Sefton Cllr for Melling. Great buildings and lovely folk I might add.

I could go on but I hope you get my drift; this is a very significant piece of historical work which covers all aspects of Melling over hundreds of years. I thoroughly recommend it to anyone interested in this historic community.

If you want to obtain a copy (£10) you can e-mail Carol Fitxgerald – cf83230@gmail.com

*Note: This is a self-published book which is printed in batches of 20’s or more, so Carol asks people to pre pay.

Maghull – Project to enhance Bobby’s Wood

Maghull folk will probably know the name Frank Sharp because of his efforts to both fund raise and improve the formerly neglected site along Stafford Moreton Way adjacent to the new Home Bargains Store in the Town.

Well Frank is now turning his attention to Bobby’s Wood (owned by Sefton Borough Council but maintained by Maghull Town Council) in the Woodend part of Maghull – the grassed and tree plot at the junction of Liverpool Road South and Northway. Here’s Frank to tell you all about it:-

‘We are undertaking an ambitious environmental crowdfunding project at Woodend (Bobby’s Wood), that we have entitled – ‘Woodend Community Woodland Project’. In essence we are trying to raise money for an (1) accessible pathway to connect current and future community driven projects and (2) a knee-high ‘birds mouth’ fence to protect the free donation of 1150 wildlife friendly hedge whips to surround the 230m site. The hedge will provide: safety for children and pets, habitat for wildlife, a beautiful natural aesthetic. There also seems to be a possibility that the hedge donors – the Tree Council will work with the environmental department at Sefton Council to undertake an evidence-based piece of research to demonstrate the effectiveness of hedges in reducing vehicle pollution (the small evidence-base currently suggest hedges can reduce this pollution by 60%). In addition, we are hoping to plant hundreds of free tree whips from Northern Forest to future proof the current trees.

There are many other costed aspirations but realistically they will be for a 2021 campaign. We have launched the campaign with a fun children’s rainbow art competition which completes on the 27.4.20 and I want to highlight the need for pledges on the crowdfunding website where there is a lovely introductory video. All the small pledges on the website make a massive difference, as it enables the large funders to decide who to allocated funds to.’

Here’s a link to the fund raising page:-

www.spacehive.com/woodend

Click on the photos/graphics above to enlarge them