A history of Sefton Borough’s Communities

Whilst searching for the of the term origin of ‘Yort’ a while back (see my posting of 23 07 19 ‘Formby – What is a Yort?’) I happened upon this fascinating document by the Museum of Liverpool & English Heritage on the internet:-

Sefton Historic Settlement Study – Merseyside Historic Characterisation Project from 2011

www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/mol/archaeology/historic-characterisation-project/Sefton-Part-6.pdf

Here’s the introduction to the 84 page document:-

Introduction to Historic Settlement Study

The aim of the historic settlement study was to produce a consistent pro-forma template of information on settlements identified across all the historical townships in all 5 districts of Merseyside as based on the relevant paper First Edition Ordnance Survey 6” to 1 mile maps for Lancashire (published 1848 -1851) and Cheshire (1881 – 1882) . The purpose was to help provide background information for the data capture of character area polygons and also bring together some information on known or highlight other historic settlements, many of which have been lost or disguised by urban development. It was also thought that information would be useful for alerting to areas of possible archaeological interest to support the development management advice given by Merseyside Archaeological Advisory Service to the five districts. Historic urban settlement character is one of the key priority areas for research within Merseyside and one for which there is currently least documented archaeological evidence.

What a useful historic database this is for those wanting to know more about the origins of their own Sefton community. Go on find where you lived and get to know more about it………

Formby – What is a Yort?

I’ve cycled past this street nameplate many times and like others in our cycling group I have scratched my head wondering what a Yort is?

Googling ‘Yort’ did not throw up any answers so my fellow cycler Roy Connell emailed the Clerk of Formby Parish Council who told him the term may mean ‘Yard’ but also suggested that we ask the views of Formby Civic Society. An e-mail to the Civic Society brought back this:-

‘I have been doing some digging in our archive and attach a newspaper cutting from about 1957 which gives some interesting background information. We hold a copy of all 10 sheets of the 1845 Tithe map and the Schedule shows Formby had 83 plots incorporating the name “Yort”.

Today I know of a house at 94 Gores Lane called Long Yort www.flickr.com/photos/formbycivicsociety/5885064473/in/album-72157625287478503/

Below is an article from “An Agricultural Study of Formby with Ainsdale” By Kim Morton (1981) Edited by J. Lewis, M. Adams & C. Ahmad which actually is related to Andrews Yort.’

Orchards

Hume (1866, 77) claimed that the first orchard in all of Lancashire was in Ravenmeols; the site was shown to him by the inhabitants of Park House in Ravenmeols, located to the south of Kirklake, in the same neighbourhood[1]. The piece of ground was called Andrew’s Gardens, or Bowers Gardens so named because two hundred years previously (about 1665) it had been occupied by Andrew Brown. His orchard had been famous for its apples (Kelly, 1973, 22). However, the orchards were destroyed by the sand moving inland and now nothing remains but the ‘mounds of sand and tufts of starrgrass’ (Hume 1866, 77). Local folklore states that Andrews Lane and Andrews Yort of the present day represent Andrew Brown’s holdings in Ravenmeols. Holt (1795, 83) comments that ‘…there are no orchards worthy of notice in this part of the country’ at the end of the 18th century (1795, 83).

So now you know what a ‘Yort’ is assuming if, like me, you were in the dark about it before.

My thanks to Formby Civic Society for their invaluable help with this posting

Click on the photos to enlarge them